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Archival description
Government With digital objects
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Cemeteries

This sub-series consists of minutes, reports, correspondence, burial ledgers, monument and burial applications, agreements, and other records relating to the various functions performed by cemeteries operated by the City of Edmonton.

Most early cemeteries in Edmonton were private or created by religious organizations. It was not until 1914 that the City established Beechmount Cemetery as the first municipal graveyard. At this time there were three other private cemeteries operating within Edmonton's city limits, including Edmonton Cemetery, Mount Pleasant Cemetery, and Little Mountain Cemetery.

The Edmonton Cemetery Company was formed in 1886 and received a charter in the same year. It was a limited stock company with no dividends issued to stockholders. The Board of Directors consisted of many of the city's prominent men including Matt McCauley, Alex Taylor, George D. K. Kinnaird. The company acquired land from the Hudson's Bay reserve and established the grave yard south of 107th Avenue between 117th and 119th Streets. Later acquisitions expanded the grounds west and northward. In 1922 a large expansion to the west included a large reserve for a military field of honor around a Cross of Sacrifice, similar to those found in Europe, erected by the Veterans War Graves Commission. In 1932 a neo-classical Mausoleum was built on the north side of 107th Avenue. By the 1960s issues of financial viability and the need for perpetual care prompted the company to initiate negotiations to surrender their charter to the city. The transfer occurred in 1965.

Mount Pleasant Cemetery was a private burial ground in Strathcona. The first burials were in the 1890s, with the earliest marker showing 1893. The Strathcona Cemetery Company formed in 1900 to administer the cemetery. The City of Edmonton took over operation of this cemetery in 1941.

Little Mountain Cemetery was formed in 1895 as a church graveyard. Land was donated to Little Mountain Cemetery Company in 1900 and it became a public burial ground. After decades of financial struggle, the records were transferred to the City in 1981, and the City took the cemetery over in 1985.

As time progressed the City required more land for cemeteries. In 1972 the City purchased land off St. Albert Trail north of 137 Avenue. It was officially named Sturgeon Heights Memorial Park in 1986, then renamed Northern Lights Memorial Park in 1987. The first burial there occurred in 1989. In 1985 a piece of City owned land was chosen for the site of a future cemetery. It was officially named South Haven Cemetery in 1987 and opened the following year.

The most recent cemetery to come under the City's control is Clover Bar Cemetery, which was established in 1901 behind the Clover Bar Church. Homesteader W.H. Wilkinson donated his land for the cemetery and he and nine other local residents formed a cemetery company. The City of Edmonton took over the running of this cemetery in 1995.

The Health Department was responsible for cemetery operations from 1914 until 1929, at which time responsibility was transferred to the Engineering Department. In 1947 the newly created Parks Department took control. The Parks Department evolved to become the Parks and Recreation Department in 1962, and later the Community Services Department in 1997.

Assessment

The City Assessor's Department was responsible for raising the funds necessary for basic municipal services through the collection of taxes. The department assessed the value of businesses, land, real estate, and local improvements, maintained the records of tax assessments and payments for individual properties, and initiated action to collect overdue taxes.

This series contains records related to the assessment and collection of various municipal taxes. Aside from property taxes, the City also collected a service tax (essentially a municipal income tax), and a business tax, which was calculated as a percentage of the rental cost of certain business' commercial space or offices. When property taxes went into arrears, the City had the option of buying the property from the owner, or auctioning them off to collect taxes owed through tax sales.

An order has been imposed on the material. It includes the following four sub-series:

  • Subseries 1 - Property Tax Records
  • Subseries 2 - Business Tax Records
  • Subseries 3 - Service Tax Records
  • Subseries 4 - Arrears and Tax Sales

The Papers of the Edmonton Town/City Secretary (1892-1912)

This series includes all incoming and outgoing correspondence and several administrative registers. The correspondence deals with all matters involving the Town, in particular municipal elections, water and sewer extensions, electric lighting, the street railway system, immigration, the sale of Town debentures, taxation, property alterations, and numerous petitions for extended services. The records have been classified according to subject and provided with an index.

This series contains the following classes:

  • Class 1: Outgoing correspondence, 1892-1894
  • Class 2: Outgoing correspondence, 1894-1896
  • Class 3: Incoming correspondence, 1895-1896
  • Class 4: Outgoing correspondence and census report, 1896-1899
  • Class 5: Incoming and outgoing correspondence, 1902-1903
  • Class 6: Plumbing undertaken for private citizens, 1902-1906
  • Class 7: Debentures sold, 1893-1906
  • Class 8: Electric metre recordings and payments, 1903
  • Class 9: Receipts and disbursements, 1903-1905
  • Class 10: Incoming and outgoing correspondence, 1904
  • Class 11: Incoming and outgoing correspondence, 1905
  • Class 12: Register and index of new buildings, 1905-1911
  • Class 13: Outgoing correspondence to various school districts, 1905-1907
  • Class 14: Electric light register, 1905-1906
  • Class 15: Incoming and outgoing correspondence, 1906
  • Class 16: Incoming and outgoing correspondence, 1907
  • Class 17: Debenture register, 1906-1910
  • Class 18: Electric metre books, 1907
  • Class 19: Electric metre books, 1908
  • Class 20: Incoming and outgoing correspondence, 1908
  • Class 21: Incoming and outgoing correspondence, 1909
  • Class 22: City Council Finance Committee, recommendations for payment, 1909-1911
  • Class 23: Disbursements, 1909-1911
  • Class 24: Incoming and outgoing correspondence, 1910
  • Class 25: Incoming and outgoing correspondence, 1911-1912

Edmonton Financial Accounts (1892-1915)

This series includes correspondence, ledgers and receipts. This series contains the following classes:

  • Class 1: Journal detailing income and expenditures, 1892-1915
  • Class 2: Cash book detailing income and expenditures, 1892-1902
  • Class 3: Ledger detailing finances of various departments and listing the major areas of public expenditure, 1892-1899 (includes index)
  • Class 4 : Ledger detailing the financial situation of the Town and listing the major areas of expenditure and sources of revenue, 1899-1904 (includes index)
  • Class 5: Two cheque books, 1894-1896
  • Class 6: Correspondence, receipts and financial statements, 1896-1904

Finance Committee

Contracts

This series includes certified copies of agreement between the corporation of Edmonton and various other parties. This series also includes agreements made by the Town of Strathcona between 1899 and 1909.

FIC - Found In Clippings collection

  • CA EDM MS-0
  • Collection
  • 1893 - 1967

The collection consists of original material removed from the City of Edmonton Archives Clippings collection.

FIC - Found in clippings collection

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