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Archivistische beschrijving
Construction
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Thistle Rink - 2nd St., Edmonton

Thistle Rink under construction. Samuel McCauley and crew erecting the arches for the Thistle Rink, situated one-half block north of Jasper Avenue on the east side of 102 Street.

Low Level Bridge

In the winter of 1898-1899 the piers for the Low Level Bridge, Edmonton's first bridge across the Saskatchewan, were built. Then in the spring of 1899 the river flooded, the water rising many feet over the top of the piers, with the result that another eight feet were added to them.
As the south pier was in the deepest part of the river, with a very swift current, it was necessary to install a pier, called an 'ice breaker', for its protection when the ice went out. This was placed a few rods up-river from the bridge pier and was put in during the winter of 1899 by Samuel McCauley.
When the ice went out in the spring of 1900, it was found that the ice breaker was not sufficient protection for the south pier and a 'nose' was then attached to the pier itself. This work was also done by Samuel McCauley.

This photo shows the beginning of the work installing the 'nose'. The icebreaker was demolished in 1960.

See also EA-430-4, EA-430-5 and EA-430-9.

Low Level Bridge

In the winter of 1898-1899 the piers for the Low Level Bridge, Edmonton's first bridge across the Saskatchewan, were built. Then in the spring of 1899 the river flooded, the water rising many feet over the top of the piers, with the result that another eight feet were added to them.
As the south pier was in the deepest part of the river, with a very swift current, it was necessary to install a pier, called an 'ice breaker', for its protection when the ice went out. This was placed a few rods up-river from the bridge pier and was put in during the winter of 1899 by Samuel McCauley.
When the ice went out in the spring of 1900, it was found that the ice breaker was not sufficient protection for the south pier and a 'nose' was then attached to the pier itself. This work was also done by Samuel McCauley.

This photo shows the beginning of the work installing the 'nose'. The icebreaker was demolished in 1960.

See also EA-430-3, EA-430-5 and EA-430-9.

Low Level Bridge

In the winter of 1898-1899 the piers for the Low Level Bridge, Edmonton's first bridge across the Saskatchewan, were built. Then in the spring of 1899 the river flooded, the water rising many feet over the top of the piers, with the result that another eight feet were added to them.
As the south pier was in the deepest part of the river, with a very swift current, it was necessary to install a pier, called an 'ice breaker', for its protection when the ice went out. This was placed a few rods up-river from the bridge pier and was put in during the winter of 1899 by Samuel McCauley.
When the ice went out in the spring of 1900, it was found that the ice breaker was not sufficient protection for the south pier and a 'nose' was then attached to the pier itself. This work was also done by Samuel McCauley.

This photo shows the beginning of the work installing the 'nose'. The icebreaker was demolished in 1960.

See also EA-430-3, EA-430-4 and EA-430-9.

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