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City of Edmonton. Parks and Recreation Department fonds Buildings
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A. MacDonald Building

10128 - 105 Avenue. The A. Macdonald Building is historically significant for the role it played in the history of the storage and cartage of wholesale grocery goods in Edmonton from its beginnings up to the mid-twentieth century. Constructed in 1913-14, it was named for Alexander Macdonald, president of the A. Macdonald Company of Winnipeg, whose Edmonton branch became one of the three largest grocery suppliers in northern Alberta. The A. Macdonald Building has an historical association with four interrelated firms - the A. Macdonald Company, H.H. Cooper and Company, Macdonald-Cooper Ltd. and Macdonald's Consolidated Limited.

Christ Church Anglican - West corner

12116 - 102 Avenue.
Christ Church was designed by a parishioner, the architect William Blakey, and built in 1921 not far from the site of the original 1909 church. The Reverend Robert Jefferson, the Bishop of the Diocese of Ottawa from 1939-1955, was the first rector. On November 7, 1909, the Bishop of Calgary presided over the opening of the old church located 116 Street and 102 Avenue. The first service in the building was held on October 9, 1921, under the rectorship of the Reverend J.M. Comyn Ching.
This Tudor-style structure featuring uncovered Douglas Fir beams in a scissor construction in the interior, is modeled after the famous Tintern Abbey in Great Britain. The parish hall was added in 1925 and the rectory built in the 1930's. Stained glass windows have been generously donated over the years by parishioners, reflecting the reverence and esteem in which the church is held by its members.
Once on the outskirts of the city, Christ Church is now part of a large urban community. The character of the building exemplifies the spiritual vision of its congregation.

Christ Church Anglican - West

12116 - 102 Avenue.
Christ Church was designed by a parishioner, the architect William Blakey, and built in 1921 not far from the site of the original 1909 church. The Reverend Robert Jefferson, the Bishop of the Diocese of Ottawa from 1939-1955, was the first rector. On November 7, 1909, the Bishop of Calgary presided over the opening of the old church located 116 Street and 102 Avenue. The first service in the building was held on October 9, 1921, under the rectorship of the Reverend J.M. Comyn Ching.
This Tudor-style structure featuring uncovered Douglas Fir beams in a scissor construction in the interior, is modeled after the famous Tintern Abbey in Great Britain. The parish hall was added in 1925 and the rectory built in the 1930's. Stained glass windows have been generously donated over the years by parishioners, reflecting the reverence and esteem in which the church is held by its members.
Once on the outskirts of the city, Christ Church is now part of a large urban community. The character of the building exemplifies the spiritual vision of its congregation.

Christ Church Anglican

12116 - 102 Avenue.
Christ Church was designed by a parishioner, the architect William Blakey, and built in 1921 not far from the site of the original 1909 church. The Reverend Robert Jefferson, the Bishop of the Diocese of Ottawa from 1939-1955, was the first rector. On November 7, 1909, the Bishop of Calgary presided over the opening of the old church located 116 Street and 102 Avenue. The first service in the building was held on October 9, 1921, under the rectorship of the Reverend J.M. Comyn Ching.
This Tudor-style structure featuring uncovered Douglas Fir beams in a scissor construction in the interior, is modeled after the famous Tintern Abbey in Great Britain. The parish hall was added in 1925 and the rectory built in the 1930's. Stained glass windows have been generously donated over the years by parishioners, reflecting the reverence and esteem in which the church is held by its members.
Once on the outskirts of the city, Christ Church is now part of a large urban community. The character of the building exemplifies the spiritual vision of its congregation.

Churchill Wire Centre

10003 - 102 Avenue
An 1886 telephone directory would have been easy to print. Four subscribers joined Edmonton's first telephone exchange established by Alexander Taylor. Within twenty years, this creative entrepreneur had connected 500 patrons to the revolutionary telephone, and sold his company to the city.
Outgoing calls were transmitted through telephone exchange equipment, with switchmen and operators connecting each call to the receiving line. Edmonton built the first municipal exchange on this site in 1907. The next year the city became a telecommunications leader when it installed the first automatic dial phones in North America.
Edmontonians used 2,000 phone lines by 1910. By 1914 more than 9,500 lines buzzed with conversation. Construction began on a new exchange immediately west of the original building, and the City converted the first brick structure into the landmark Labour Hall. The exchange soon required even more space. In the 1940s city architect Max Dewar designed an addition that doubled the building's capacity, and replaced the Labour Hall entirely. Remarkably, at the height of its operation, this exchange depended on twelve switchmen and two dozen operators to manage the equipment running through the huge building.
Dewar's vision for the Churchill Wire Centre set the standard for the 1957 City Hall and for subsequent structures surrounding the newly conceived idea of a central civic square. With modern materials, innovative technology, and the age of machines as Dewar's inspiration, the telephone exchange building remains a classic example of Moderne architecture. The style emerged from the Art Deco movement and introduced simple, smooth surfaces and the use of reflective material such as the glass blocks and polished black granite on this building. The winged figure holding lightening bolts and cables above the entrance represents new communication technology and typifies Moderne flourishes.
By 1949 almost three quarters of the available lines had been used and the downtown building eventually became too cramped and expensive. The Churchill Wire Centre was abandoned, but community pressure concerning the building's historical significance saved it from demolition in the 1990s.

Churchill Wire Centre

10003 - 102 Avenue
An 1886 telephone directory would have been easy to print. Four subscribers joined Edmonton's first telephone exchange established by Alexander Taylor. Within twenty years, this creative entrepreneur had connected 500 patrons to the revolutionary telephone, and sold his company to the city.
Outgoing calls were transmitted through telephone exchange equipment, with switchmen and operators connecting each call to the receiving line. Edmonton built the first municipal exchange on this site in 1907. The next year the city became a telecommunications leader when it installed the first automatic dial phones in North America.
Edmontonians used 2,000 phone lines by 1910. By 1914 more than 9,500 lines buzzed with conversation. Construction began on a new exchange immediately west of the original building, and the City converted the first brick structure into the landmark Labour Hall. The exchange soon required even more space. In the 1940s city architect Max Dewar designed an addition that doubled the building's capacity, and replaced the Labour Hall entirely. Remarkably, at the height of its operation, this exchange depended on twelve switchmen and two dozen operators to manage the equipment running through the huge building.
Dewar's vision for the Churchill Wire Centre set the standard for the 1957 City Hall and for subsequent structures surrounding the newly conceived idea of a central civic square. With modern materials, innovative technology, and the age of machines as Dewar's inspiration, the telephone exchange building remains a classic example of Moderne architecture. The style emerged from the Art Deco movement and introduced simple, smooth surfaces and the use of reflective material such as the glass blocks and polished black granite on this building. The winged figure holding lightening bolts and cables above the entrance represents new communication technology and typifies Moderne flourishes.
By 1949 almost three quarters of the available lines had been used and the downtown building eventually became too cramped and expensive. The Churchill Wire Centre was abandoned, but community pressure concerning the building's historical significance saved it from demolition in the 1990s.

Churchill Wire Centre

10003 - 102 Avenue
An 1886 telephone directory would have been easy to print. Four subscribers joined Edmonton's first telephone exchange established by Alexander Taylor. Within twenty years, this creative entrepreneur had connected 500 patrons to the revolutionary telephone, and sold his company to the city.
Outgoing calls were transmitted through telephone exchange equipment, with switchmen and operators connecting each call to the receiving line. Edmonton built the first municipal exchange on this site in 1907. The next year the city became a telecommunications leader when it installed the first automatic dial phones in North America.
Edmontonians used 2,000 phone lines by 1910. By 1914 more than 9,500 lines buzzed with conversation. Construction began on a new exchange immediately west of the original building, and the City converted the first brick structure into the landmark Labour Hall. The exchange soon required even more space. In the 1940s city architect Max Dewar designed an addition that doubled the building's capacity, and replaced the Labour Hall entirely. Remarkably, at the height of its operation, this exchange depended on twelve switchmen and two dozen operators to manage the equipment running through the huge building.
Dewar's vision for the Churchill Wire Centre set the standard for the 1957 City Hall and for subsequent structures surrounding the newly conceived idea of a central civic square. With modern materials, innovative technology, and the age of machines as Dewar's inspiration, the telephone exchange building remains a classic example of Moderne architecture. The style emerged from the Art Deco movement and introduced simple, smooth surfaces and the use of reflective material such as the glass blocks and polished black granite on this building. The winged figure holding lightening bolts and cables above the entrance represents new communication technology and typifies Moderne flourishes.
By 1949 almost three quarters of the available lines had been used and the downtown building eventually became too cramped and expensive. The Churchill Wire Centre was abandoned, but community pressure concerning the building's historical significance saved it from demolition in the 1990s.

College Avenue High School

10036 Macdonald Drive.
In 1895, on a nearby site overlooking its historic river valley, the recently incorporated town of Edmonton built the College Avenue High School. There, under K.W. MacKenzie, its first principal, many of the city's outstanding citizens furthered their education.

College Universitaire Saint-Jean

8406 - 91 Avenue.
On this site in 1910 College Saint-Jean opened for the first time in Edmonton. Established the previous year in Pincher Creek by the Oblates of Mary Immaculate, the College has since become recognized as a focus for French culture in Alberta. Its high standards in all fields of learning were affirmed by its recognition as a Faculty of the University of Alberta in 1977.

Concordia College

7128 Ada Boulevard.
On this site in 1926 Concordia College officially opened its first building. Founded five years earlier by Pastor E. Eberhardt, the College has since provided Alberta with exemplary standards in religious and other studies. In 1975 the achievements of the College were acknowledged by its affiliation with the University of Alberta.

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