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City of Edmonton. Parks and Recreation Department fonds Historic buildings
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Hudson's Bay Company Building

10230 Jasper Avenue.
The Hudson's Bay Company (HBC) opened the front doors of the third and final phase of the department store on November 14, 1939. The first visitors would have noticed the unique smooth lines of the building, complete with black Quebec granite on the lower storey, and buff Manitoba Tyndall limestone on the upper levels. Unique hand carvings over each entrance depicted scenes from the adventurous history of Canada's most famous trading company. Built by the Bennett and White Construction Company of Calgary for $1 million, the low, three-storey building is one of the few remaining examples of the Moderne style to survive in Edmonton. For the Winnipeg architects, Moody and Moore, the design revealed the new, machine age in architectural technology.
The HBC is the oldest incorporated joint-stock company in the English world and the oldest business institution in North America. The company played a major role in the development of western Canada and the growth of Edmonton. Opening its first fur-trading post in the district in 1795, the HBC built its first store outside the fort on Jasper Avenue and 98th Street in 1890.

Hudson's Bay Company Building

10230 Jasper Avenue.
The Hudson's Bay Company (HBC) opened the front doors of the third and final phase of the department store on November 14, 1939. The first visitors would have noticed the unique smooth lines of the building, complete with black Quebec granite on the lower storey, and buff Manitoba Tyndall limestone on the upper levels. Unique hand carvings over each entrance depicted scenes from the adventurous history of Canada's most famous trading company. Built by the Bennett and White Construction Company of Calgary for $1 million, the low, three-storey building is one of the few remaining examples of the Moderne style to survive in Edmonton. For the Winnipeg architects, Moody and Moore, the design revealed the new, machine age in architectural technology.
The HBC is the oldest incorporated joint-stock company in the English world and the oldest business institution in North America. The company played a major role in the development of western Canada and the growth of Edmonton. Opening its first fur-trading post in the district in 1795, the HBC built its first store outside the fort on Jasper Avenue and 98th Street in 1890.

Hudson's Bay Company Building - Doors

10230 Jasper Avenue.
The Hudson's Bay Company (HBC) opened the front doors of the third and final phase of the department store on November 14, 1939. The first visitors would have noticed the unique smooth lines of the building, complete with black Quebec granite on the lower storey, and buff Manitoba Tyndall limestone on the upper levels. Unique hand carvings over each entrance depicted scenes from the adventurous history of Canada's most famous trading company. Built by the Bennett and White Construction Company of Calgary for $1 million, the low, three-storey building is one of the few remaining examples of the Moderne style to survive in Edmonton. For the Winnipeg architects, Moody and Moore, the design revealed the new, machine age in architectural technology.
The HBC is the oldest incorporated joint-stock company in the English world and the oldest business institution in North America. The company played a major role in the development of western Canada and the growth of Edmonton. Opening its first fur-trading post in the district in 1795, the HBC built its first store outside the fort on Jasper Avenue and 98th Street in 1890.

Hudson's Bay Company Stables

9722 - 102 Street.
Ortona Armouries.
Burgeoning business prompted the HBC to erect this warehouse and stable for its delivery horses in 1914. The brick masonry, sandstone cartouches, and ornamental HBC coat of arms complemented similar historic buildings in the neighbourhood.
In 1924, when horse-drawn delivery wagons gave way to motorized trucks, the HBC leased its stables to various tenants, including the Edmonton Pure Butter Company, an award-winning dairy comprised of former employees of the Edmonton City Dairy. After the Second World War began in 1939, the HBC sold the building to the Department of National Defence for one dollar. The Royal Canadian Navy Volunteer Reserve, Edmonton Half-Company, needed a new home. The military renovated the old stables to accommodate offices and training facilities for more than 3,700 recruits. The navy commissioned this land-locked navel base the HMCS Nonsuch as a tribute to the original owners. The Nonsuch was the name of the first HBC ship to enter the Hudson's Bay in 1668.

Hull Block

10601 - 97 Street.
The Hull Block was built by William Roper Hull who was born in England and came to Canada with his brother John in 1873. William Hull built the Hull Block in 1914 at a cost of $35,000. Plans for this building were prepared by architect Edward Collis Hopkins and called for a bath brick and white cast cement exterior. The contractor was Dunlop Johnson Construction Company.
Hopkins' design tends toward Edwardian Classicism or classic revival, a popular style for commercial blocks of the time. Elements of the style include a projecting pressed metal cornice, a decorated parapet with keystone and inscription (Hull Block), storefront cornice with dentils and ornamental keystones above the windows.
The building has remained much the same over the years, except for the main floor businesses and their signage. For more than 40 years, the main floor was home to pharmacies.

Hyndman House

10123 - 136 Street.
This house is the work of prominent Edmonton architect, George Heath MacDonald, who had already designed several of the city's important public buildings in the neo-classical style. However on this project he experimented with modernism, seeming to incorporate some elements of Art Deco, Moderne, and International Style.
MacDonald worked on this house for his friend Lou Hyndman. Born in Edmonton in 1904, Hyndman practiced law in the city after graduating from the University of Alberta. Premier E.C. Manning appointed him Master in Chambers in the Alberta Supreme Court, a position he held for more than twenty-five years. Hyndman chaired the Edmonton Planning Committee, and served on the Edmonton Public School Board. Louis and Muriel's son Lou Hyndman Jr. became well known as the MLA for Glenora and as provincial treasurer in the Lougheed government. The family owned this home from 1946 to 2002.

Hyndman House

10123 - 136 Street.
This house is the work of prominent Edmonton architect, George Heath MacDonald, who had already designed several of the city's important public buildings in the neo-classical style. However on this project he experimented with modernism, seeming to incorporate some elements of Art Deco, Moderne, and International Style.
MacDonald worked on this house for his friend Lou Hyndman. Born in Edmonton in 1904, Hyndman practiced law in the city after graduating from the University of Alberta. Premier E.C. Manning appointed him Master in Chambers in the Alberta Supreme Court, a position he held for more than twenty-five years. Hyndman chaired the Edmonton Planning Committee, and served on the Edmonton Public School Board. Louis and Muriel's son Lou Hyndman Jr. became well known as the MLA for Glenora and as provincial treasurer in the Lougheed government. The family owned this home from 1946 to 2002.

Imperial Bank of Canada / Imperial Bank of Commerce

9986 - 9990 Jasper Avenue.
This building housed the former Imperial Bank of Canada, the first bank to open a branch in Edmonton. Its presence in this location goes back to 1893. Later it became the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce. Designed by Imperial Bank architect A.J. Everett along with the Edmonton firm of Rule, Wynn and Rule, construction of this building began in 1951 with the basement and ground floor. Six additional floors were added by 1954.
The building's architectural style is an excellent and very early example of Modern Classicism. The building illustrates the banking history in Edmonton since the Imperial Bank of Canada was the first chartered bank in Edmonton and was of primary importance to the city.

King Edward School - Entrance

8525 - 101 Street.
Built at a cost of $180,000, King Edward School opened its doors to students on March 9, 1914. Originally, it had 17 classrooms, separate playrooms for boys and girls, separate rooms for manual training and domestic science, an automatic heat regulator, and shower baths. For the first time, the large assembly hall common to schools of this time, was built on the ground floor instead of the top floor, to accommodate its use as a social centre for the surrounding community.
Inside, the foyer features oak paneled walls, latticed windows and doors and a terrazzo floor leading to a marble stairway. Fifteen foot ceilings, wide hallways and oak mouldings and railings are found throughout.
King Edward School has a long list of distinguished alumni, but perhaps the shining moment in the school's history occurred during the Royal Visit of 1939 when King George VI and Queen Elizabeth visited the school.

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