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City of Edmonton. Parks and Recreation Department fonds Houses Anglais
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Lester Allyn House

9932 - 112 Street. This house was built in 1907 by Lester Allyn, an Edmonton building contractor. Allyn also built several other houses in the immediate area to take advantage of the booming market for housing in the new provincial capital. This house was used by Allyn as his own home until 1911. The next resident of the house was Frank Ford, a lawyer who later became Chancellor of the University of Alberta and a justice of the Supreme Court of Alberta. The house was also home to Arthur Dodman, general manager of the Hudson's Bay Company in Edmonton from 1915-17.
The main significance of the house, however, lies in its ties to the pre- 1912 residential housing boom in Edmonton. It is an excellent example of the kind of upper middle class housing built at the time. This is reflected in its location in then fashionable Oliver, the choice of brick as an exterior building material and the size and interior fittings of the house. By the 1920s and 1930s, this area was less fashionable and this is reflected in the home?s residents who included widows, clerks, a carpenter, a baker and a steamship company agent. The house also retains much of its original appearance and architectural details including two colours, a two storey bay window and decorative "piano" windows over the entrance hall.
This may be one of the most intact houses from the pre- First World War period left in Edmonton and serves as an excellent reminder of residential housing patterns and preferences in that period.

Lester Allyn House

9932 - 112 Street.
This house was built in 1907 by Lester Allyn, an Edmonton building contractor. Allyn also built several other houses in the immediate area to take advantage of the booming market for housing in the new provincial capital. This house was used by Allyn as his own home until 1911. The next resident of the house was Frank Ford, a lawyer who later became Chancellor of the University of Alberta and a justice of the Supreme Court of Alberta. The house was also home to Arthur Dodman, general manager of the Hudson's Bay Company in Edmonton from 1915-17.
The main significance of the house, however, lies in its ties to the pre- 1912 residential housing boom in Edmonton. It is an excellent example of the kind of upper middle class housing built at the time. This is reflected in its location in then fashionable Oliver, the choice of brick as an exterior building material and the size and interior fittings of the house. By the 1920s and 1930s, this area was less fashionable and this is reflected in the home?s residents who included widows, clerks, a carpenter, a baker and a steamship company agent. The house also retains much of its original appearance and architectural details including two colours, a two storey bay window and decorative "piano" windows over the entrance hall.
This may be one of the most intact houses from the pre- First World War period left in Edmonton and serves as an excellent reminder of residential housing patterns and preferences in that period.

George S. Armstrong Residence - NE

10050 - 117 Street. George S. Armstrong, City of Edmonton Alderman from 1908 to 1910, and Mayor from 1911 to 1912 lived here. Mr. Armstrong was an active participant in the social, business and political life of the city. He was first mayor of the amalgamated cities of Edmonton and Strathcona. After declining to seek re-election as mayor he was named southside Postmaster in 1913 and retired from the Post Office in 1937. He also ran a successful drug store on 97th Street and 103 A Avenue. George S. Armstrong is remembered as a hardworking, fair and honest person who served our city well during a time of rapid change and growth.

George S. Armstrong Residence

10050 - 117 Street. George S. Armstrong, City of Edmonton Alderman from 1908 to 1910, and Mayor from 1911 to 1912 lived here. Mr. Armstrong was an active participant in the social, business and political life of the city. He was first mayor of the amalgamated cities of Edmonton and Strathcona. After declining to seek re-election as mayor he was named southside Postmaster in 1913 and retired from the Post Office in 1937. He also ran a successful drug store on 97th Street and 103 A Avenue. George S. Armstrong is remembered as a hardworking, fair and honest person who served our city well during a time of rapid change and growth.

Bard Residence & Carriage House

10544 - 84 Avenue. On May 21, 1912 Delmar Bard obtained building permit number 259 to construct this wonderful neo-Georgian style home. The permit listed Mr. Bard as the contractor and Mr. L. Keith as architect, and the cost was estimated at $6,500. Once completed this 2.5 storey, 427 square metre residence was an outstanding addition to this area.
Delmar Bard came from the American mid-west to Alberta in 1896. He worked at various occupations including Indian agent, provincial roads and bridge inspector and real estate speculator. His ingenuity is reflected in several aspects of the house. One main feature of the home is a built-in central vacuum system. Also, he installed an automobile turntable in front of the garage so he would not have to reverse his vehicle out of the driveway. This has since been removed.
The interior of the home is lavishly furnished with period stained glass windows imported from France. Fine oak woodwork is found throughout the home and the ceilings are trimmed with dentilled moulding. Built-in bookcases, leatherette wallpaper, and some period light fixtures add to the charm of this residence.
Following Delmar's death in 1938, the home was subdivided into suites. These divisions were later removed by Sue Bard, granddaughter of the original owner.

Bard Residence

10544 - 84 Avenue. On May 21, 1912 Delmar Bard obtained building permit number 259 to construct this wonderful neo-Georgian style home. The permit listed Mr. Bard as the contractor and Mr. L. Keith as architect, and the cost was estimated at $6,500. Once completed this 2.5 storey, 427 square metre residence was an outstanding addition to this area.
Delmar Bard came from the American mid-west to Alberta in 1896. He worked at various occupations including Indian agent, provincial roads and bridge inspector and real estate speculator. His ingenuity is reflected in several aspects of the house. One main feature of the home is a built-in central vacuum system. Also, he installed an automobile turntable in front of the garage so he would not have to reverse his vehicle out of the driveway. This has since been removed.
The interior of the home is lavishly furnished with period stained glass windows imported from France. Fine oak woodwork is found throughout the home and the ceilings are trimmed with dentilled moulding. Built-in bookcases, leatherette wallpaper, and some period light fixtures add to the charm of this residence.
Following Delmar's death in 1938, the home was subdivided into suites. These divisions were later removed by Sue Bard, granddaughter of the original owner.

Bard Residence & Carriage House

10544 - 84 Avenue. On May 21, 1912 Delmar Bard obtained building permit number 259 to construct this wonderful neo-Georgian style home. The permit listed Mr. Bard as the contractor and Mr. L. Keith as architect, and the cost was estimated at $6,500. Once completed this 2.5 storey, 427 square metre residence was an outstanding addition to this area.
Delmar Bard came from the American mid-west to Alberta in 1896. He worked at various occupations including Indian agent, provincial roads and bridge inspector and real estate speculator. His ingenuity is reflected in several aspects of the house. One main feature of the home is a built-in central vacuum system. Also, he installed an automobile turntable in front of the garage so he would not have to reverse his vehicle out of the driveway. This has since been removed.
The interior of the home is lavishly furnished with period stained glass windows imported from France. Fine oak woodwork is found throughout the home and the ceilings are trimmed with dentilled moulding. Built-in bookcases, leatherette wallpaper, and some period light fixtures add to the charm of this residence.
Following Delmar's death in 1938, the home was subdivided into suites. These divisions were later removed by Sue Bard, granddaughter of the original owner.

Bard Residence - Front

10544 - 84 Avenue. On May 21, 1912 Delmar Bard obtained building permit number 259 to construct this wonderful neo-Georgian style home. The permit listed Mr. Bard as the contractor and Mr. L. Keith as architect, and the cost was estimated at $6,500. Once completed this 2.5 storey, 427 square metre residence was an outstanding addition to this area.
Delmar Bard came from the American mid-west to Alberta in 1896. He worked at various occupations including Indian agent, provincial roads and bridge inspector and real estate speculator. His ingenuity is reflected in several aspects of the house. One main feature of the home is a built-in central vacuum system. Also, he installed an automobile turntable in front of the garage so he would not have to reverse his vehicle out of the driveway. This has since been removed.
The interior of the home is lavishly furnished with period stained glass windows imported from France. Fine oak woodwork is found throughout the home and the ceilings are trimmed with dentilled moulding. Built-in bookcases, leatherette wallpaper, and some period light fixtures add to the charm of this residence.
Following Delmar's death in 1938, the home was subdivided into suites. These divisions were later removed by Sue Bard, granddaughter of the original owner.

Bard Residence - SW

10544 - 84 Avenue. On May 21, 1912 Delmar Bard obtained building permit number 259 to construct this wonderful neo-Georgian style home. The permit listed Mr. Bard as the contractor and Mr. L. Keith as architect, and the cost was estimated at $6,500. Once completed this 2.5 storey, 427 square metre residence was an outstanding addition to this area.
Delmar Bard came from the American mid-west to Alberta in 1896. He worked at various occupations including Indian agent, provincial roads and bridge inspector and real estate speculator. His ingenuity is reflected in several aspects of the house. One main feature of the home is a built-in central vacuum system. Also, he installed an automobile turntable in front of the garage so he would not have to reverse his vehicle out of the driveway. This has since been removed.
The interior of the home is lavishly furnished with period stained glass windows imported from France. Fine oak woodwork is found throughout the home and the ceilings are trimmed with dentilled moulding. Built-in bookcases, leatherette wallpaper, and some period light fixtures add to the charm of this residence.
Following Delmar's death in 1938, the home was subdivided into suites. These divisions were later removed by Sue Bard, granddaughter of the original owner.

Bard Residence Carriage House

10544 - 84 Avenue. On May 21, 1912 Delmar Bard obtained building permit number 259 to construct this wonderful neo-Georgian style home. The permit listed Mr. Bard as the contractor and Mr. L. Keith as architect, and the cost was estimated at $6,500. Once completed this 2.5 storey, 427 square metre residence was an outstanding addition to this area.
Delmar Bard came from the American mid-west to Alberta in 1896. He worked at various occupations including Indian agent, provincial roads and bridge inspector and real estate speculator. His ingenuity is reflected in several aspects of the house. One main feature of the home is a built-in central vacuum system. Also, he installed an automobile turntable in front of the garage so he would not have to reverse his vehicle out of the driveway. This has since been removed.
The interior of the home is lavishly furnished with period stained glass windows imported from France. Fine oak woodwork is found throughout the home and the ceilings are trimmed with dentilled moulding. Built-in bookcases, leatherette wallpaper, and some period light fixtures add to the charm of this residence.
Following Delmar's death in 1938, the home was subdivided into suites. These divisions were later removed by Sue Bard, granddaughter of the original owner.

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