Print preview Close

Showing 861 results

Archivistische beschrijving
Historic buildings
Print preview View:

856 results with digital objects Show results with digital objects

A. MacDonald Building - SE

10128 - 105 Avenue. The A. Macdonald Building is historically significant for the role it played in the history of the storage and cartage of wholesale grocery goods in Edmonton from its beginnings up to the mid-twentieth century. Constructed in 1913-14, it was named for Alexander Macdonald, president of the A. Macdonald Company of Winnipeg, whose Edmonton branch became one of the three largest grocery suppliers in northern Alberta. The A. Macdonald Building has an historical association with four interrelated firms - the A. Macdonald Company, H.H. Cooper and Company, Macdonald-Cooper Ltd. and Macdonald's Consolidated Limited.

A. MacDonald Building - NE

10128 - 105 Avenue. The A. Macdonald Building is historically significant for the role it played in the history of the storage and cartage of wholesale grocery goods in Edmonton from its beginnings up to the mid-twentieth century. Constructed in 1913-14, it was named for Alexander Macdonald, president of the A. Macdonald Company of Winnipeg, whose Edmonton branch became one of the three largest grocery suppliers in northern Alberta. The A. Macdonald Building has an historical association with four interrelated firms - the A. Macdonald Company, H.H. Cooper and Company, Macdonald-Cooper Ltd. and Macdonald's Consolidated Limited.

Alberta Hotel

9700 Jasper Avenue. When the Alberta Hotel was built in 1903 it was regarded as the most fashionable establishment in Edmonton. It included the finest bar and restaurant in the district and featured an elevator, a unique call bell system and the Town's first shower baths. It was here that Sir Wilfred Laurier stayed when he proclaimed Alberta a province in 1905.

Armstrong Block Front

10125 - 104 Street. This 1912 structure is one of the city's finest remaining examples of commercial style architecture. It is significant because of its association with the early development of Edmonton's warehouse district, an area that accommodated the city's industrial and warehousing commerce. The Armstrong Block is one of a collection of surviving, important warehouse buildings that attest to Edmonton's rapid expansion prior to World War I. The uniqueness of this building is the combination of residential, warehouse and commercial uses, the same functions that it has served since its construction.
The Armstrong Block is also noted for its architecture, a prominent example of Edwardian-era combination of commercial and residential functions. The basement and first floor served wholesale businesses; offices were located on the second floor while the third and fourth floors housed residential units.
The Armstrong was the only building in the warehouse district to be constructed with brick and steel throughout, unusual at the time. Designer David Hardie included such architectural details as projecting brick pilasters, cast stone detailing, arched lintel, pressed metal cornices and an elevated front stone parapet with cast stone "A" insignia.
The building was fully restored in 2004.

Armstrong Block

10125 - 104 Street. This 1912 structure is one of the city's finest remaining examples of commercial style architecture. It is significant because of its association with the early development of Edmonton's warehouse district, an area that accommodated the city's industrial and warehousing commerce. The Armstrong Block is one of a collection of surviving, important warehouse buildings that attest to Edmonton's rapid expansion prior to World War I. The uniqueness of this building is the combination of residential, warehouse and commercial uses, the same functions that it has served since its construction.
The Armstrong Block is also noted for its architecture, a prominent example of Edwardian-era combination of commercial and residential functions. The basement and first floor served wholesale businesses; offices were located on the second floor while the third and fourth floors housed residential units.
The Armstrong was the only building in the warehouse district to be constructed with brick and steel throughout, unusual at the time. Designer David Hardie included such architectural details as projecting brick pilasters, cast stone detailing, arched lintel, pressed metal cornices and an elevated front stone parapet with cast stone "A" insignia.
The building was fully restored in 2004.

Arts Building - SE

The University of Alberta's Arts Building was officially opened on October 6, 1915 by Alberta's first Lieutenant-Governor, G.H.V. Bulyea. The building was designed by the architectural firm of Messrs. Nobbs and Hyde of Montreal. The contractors were George Fullert and Company. The building is one of Edmonton's finest examples of the neo-classic style of architecture. Originally the Arts Building contained lecture rooms, laboratories, administrative offices and a convocation hall.

Arts Building

The University of Alberta's Arts Building was officially opened on October 6, 1915 by Alberta's first Lieutenant-Governor, G.H.V. Bulyea. The building was designed by the architectural firm of Messrs. Nobbs and Hyde of Montreal. The contractors were George Fullert and Company. The building is one of Edmonton's finest examples of the neo-classic style of architecture. Originally the Arts Building contained lecture rooms, laboratories, administrative offices and a convocation hall.

Arts Building

The University of Alberta's Arts Building was officially opened on October 6, 1915 by Alberta's first Lieutenant-Governor, G.H.V. Bulyea. The building was designed by the architectural firm of Messrs. Nobbs and Hyde of Montreal. The contractors were George Fullert and Company. The building is one of Edmonton's finest examples of the neo-classic style of architecture. Originally the Arts Building contained lecture rooms, laboratories, administrative offices and a convocation hall.

Balfour Manor

10139 - 116 Street. Balfour Manor began life as Fire Hall No. 4, built by the City of Edmonton in 1911-1912, to serve the developing west end. The Fire Hall was built to accommodate horses and horse-drawn equipment but was closed in 1921 due to 'motorization of the department'. Thereafter, the building served for a time as a garage, a residence and a home/office for a mail contractor. In 1935, it was the location for the Midland Bus Lines garage. During the time that the building was used as a bus garage, apartments were occupied on the upper floors.
In 1939, the building was remodeled and modernized by Edmonton contractor Joseph N. Cote, and the new ten-unit apartment opened in August as Balfour Manor. It continues as an apartment building to the present day.

Balfour Manor - Detail

10139 - 116 Street. Balfour Manor began life as Fire Hall No. 4, built by the City of Edmonton in 1911-1912, to serve the developing west end. The Fire Hall was built to accommodate horses and horse-drawn equipment but was closed in 1921 due to 'motorization of the department'. Thereafter, the building served for a time as a garage, a residence and a home/office for a mail contractor. In 1935, it was the location for the Midland Bus Lines garage. During the time that the building was used as a bus garage, apartments were occupied on the upper floors.
In 1939, the building was remodeled and modernized by Edmonton contractor Joseph N. Cote, and the new ten-unit apartment opened in August as Balfour Manor. It continues as an apartment building to the present day.

Resultaten 31 tot 40 van 861