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City of Edmonton. Parks and Recreation Department fonds Houses Anglais
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Charles J. Carter Residence

10603 - 103 Street
Charles J. Carter constructed this home in 1907. Similar to single-family dwellings built by other Edmonton entrepreneurs at the time, his house features a wooden frame, lapped wood siding, and a front veranda with turned porch columns.
The City relocated the Carter residence and stable from their original location at 54 Heiminck Street (10002-107 Avenue) to this spot in 1995 as a tribute to a time when horses, pigs, and chickens were more common in Edmonton yards than Fords, Toyotas, and Jeeps.
Carter worked as a contractor, blacksmith, and packer for the furniture company Blowey-Henry, and although his name graces this home, he only lived here for a short time. Others enjoyed the home for many long years. Residents included the baker, Charles W. Campbell; a retired couple, James and Mary Gauld; the men of the Men's Co-operative Residence here in the 1950s; and the longest-staying occupant, Martha Pehl, an employee of McGavin's bakery before her retirement.

Charles J. Carter Residence - Front

10603 - 103 Street
Charles J. Carter constructed this home in 1907. Similar to single-family dwellings built by other Edmonton entrepreneurs at the time, his house features a wooden frame, lapped wood siding, and a front veranda with turned porch columns.
The City relocated the Carter residence and stable from their original location at 54 Heiminck Street (10002-107 Avenue) to this spot in 1995 as a tribute to a time when horses, pigs, and chickens were more common in Edmonton yards than Fords, Toyotas, and Jeeps.
Carter worked as a contractor, blacksmith, and packer for the furniture company Blowey-Henry, and although his name graces this home, he only lived here for a short time. Others enjoyed the home for many long years. Residents included the baker, Charles W. Campbell; a retired couple, James and Mary Gauld; the men of the Men's Co-operative Residence here in the 1950s; and the longest-staying occupant, Martha Pehl, an employee of McGavin's bakery before her retirement.

Chenier-Beauchamp Residence

9926 & 9928 - 112 Street.
In 1910 Eliza Chenier obtained a building permit for a duplex to be constructed on this site. Mrs. Chenier was the widow of Joseph Chenier who had owned a general store on Jasper Avenue, and is an interesting example of an early Edmonton female entrepreneur. In addition to her real estate investments, she was also listed as co-owner of the Strathcona Hotel from 1912 to 1923 with a business partner Joseph Beauchamp. Eliza Chenier lived in one half of the duplex until 1926 and Joseph Beauchamp occupied the other until 1919.
Their ownership of the Strathcona Hotel did not work out well and their mortgage company foreclosed on the partnership in 1923, just before the repeal of Prohibition would make most hotels profitable again. Nonetheless, Beauchamp was a well-known local hotelier having owned or managed several hotels in Fort Saskatchewan and Edmonton. He is best known for his association with the Cecil Hotel from 1924 until his death in 1949.
The heritage value of the duplex also is found in its design and architectural details. Its symmetrical form and square, box-like layout marks it as a variation of the classical four-square house pattern. However, as a duplex it is much larger than most Edmonton residences built in this style. The full length front porch and smaller central second floor porch, wide window casings with decorative crowns, and extensive use of clapboard all reflect building styles and tastes in the early 1900s. Along with the other heritage buildings in the area, it helps create a sense of the streetscape in a pre- First World War Edmonton neighbourhood.

Chenier-Beauchamp Residence

9926 & 9928 - 112 Street.
In 1910 Eliza Chenier obtained a building permit for a duplex to be constructed on this site. Mrs. Chenier was the widow of Joseph Chenier who had owned a general store on Jasper Avenue, and is an interesting example of an early Edmonton female entrepreneur. In addition to her real estate investments, she was also listed as co-owner of the Strathcona Hotel from 1912 to 1923 with a business partner Joseph Beauchamp. Eliza Chenier lived in one half of the duplex until 1926 and Joseph Beauchamp occupied the other until 1919.
Their ownership of the Strathcona Hotel did not work out well and their mortgage company foreclosed on the partnership in 1923, just before the repeal of Prohibition would make most hotels profitable again. Nonetheless, Beauchamp was a well-known local hotelier having owned or managed several hotels in Fort Saskatchewan and Edmonton. He is best known for his association with the Cecil Hotel from 1924 until his death in 1949.
The heritage value of the duplex also is found in its design and architectural details. Its symmetrical form and square, box-like layout marks it as a variation of the classical four-square house pattern. However, as a duplex it is much larger than most Edmonton residences built in this style. The full length front porch and smaller central second floor porch, wide window casings with decorative crowns, and extensive use of clapboard all reflect building styles and tastes in the early 1900s. Along with the other heritage buildings in the area, it helps create a sense of the streetscape in a pre- First World War Edmonton neighbourhood.

Arthur Davies Residence - East

10606 - 84 Avenue
This large brick Queen Anne style residence was built in about the year 1907 by Arthur Davies.
Mr. Davies was prominent in Strathcona's commercial and political life after 1895, and his grocery emporium was well known. He served as Strathcona's mayor in 1905 and once again in 1911, overseeing the amalgamation of the Cities of Strathcona and Edmonton. Mr. Davies earned recognition as the "Father of Greater Edmonton".
The Davies house design incorporates twin, two storey bow windows and classical details including sandstone string courses and lintels. A second storey balcony is supported by Tuscan columns from the porch below, and the underside of the roof.

Arthur Davies Residence

10606 - 84 Avenue
This large brick Queen Anne style residence was built in about the year 1907 by Arthur Davies.
Mr. Davies was prominent in Strathcona's commercial and political life after 1895, and his grocery emporium was well known. He served as Strathcona's mayor in 1905 and once again in 1911, overseeing the amalgamation of the Cities of Strathcona and Edmonton. Mr. Davies earned recognition as the "Father of Greater Edmonton".
The Davies house design incorporates twin, two storey bow windows and classical details including sandstone string courses and lintels. A second storey balcony is supported by Tuscan columns from the porch below, and the underside of the roof.

Arthur Davies Residence - SW

10606 - 84 Avenue
This large brick Queen Anne style residence was built in about the year 1907 by Arthur Davies.
Mr. Davies was prominent in Strathcona's commercial and political life after 1895, and his grocery emporium was well known. He served as Strathcona's mayor in 1905 and once again in 1911, overseeing the amalgamation of the Cities of Strathcona and Edmonton. Mr. Davies earned recognition as the "Father of Greater Edmonton".
The Davies house design incorporates twin, two storey bow windows and classical details including sandstone string courses and lintels. A second storey balcony is supported by Tuscan columns from the porch below, and the underside of the roof.

Arthur Davies Residence -SE

10606 - 84 Avenue
This large brick Queen Anne style residence was built in about the year 1907 by Arthur Davies.
Mr. Davies was prominent in Strathcona's commercial and political life after 1895, and his grocery emporium was well known. He served as Strathcona's mayor in 1905 and once again in 1911, overseeing the amalgamation of the Cities of Strathcona and Edmonton. Mr. Davies earned recognition as the "Father of Greater Edmonton".
The Davies house design incorporates twin, two storey bow windows and classical details including sandstone string courses and lintels. A second storey balcony is supported by Tuscan columns from the porch below, and the underside of the roof.

Hugh Duncan Residence

8520 - 104 Street
Hugh Duncan commissioned John Sanford to build a large, embellished version of a Foursquare home for his family here in 1911. At the time, the Edwardian era Foursquares were the most popular house style on the prairies, projecting a modest dignity: symmetrical and simplistic in ornamentation, yet lavish in stature and domesticity. This house features a flared bell cast roof with curved dormer windows, tapered posts supporting a full-length open veranda, a projected front door entrance, a north-facing bay window, and keystone details above the ground floor windows.
Hugh and Clara Duncan, together with their children Edgar, Grace, and Brock, truly made what was then 60 Main Street North a fine home after it was completed in 1912. Edgar, wounded in Passchendaele during the First World War, returned here to study engineering at the University of Alberta. Brock followed in his father's footsteps, and established the Jasper Place Pharmacy. He later took over his father's business, Duncan's Drug Store on Whyte Avenue, after Hugh's death in 1935. Grace became a teacher and lived here with her family until the city bought the house in the 1960s.
Two decades later, the Old Strathcona Foundation purchased and renovated the residence for use as its organizational headquarters.

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