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Archivistische beschrijving
Historic buildings
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Alberta College

In the 1860s the Reverend George MacDougall bequeathed his homestead on this site to the Methodist Church for educational and missionary purposes. Alberta College was founded by members of the MacDougall Church Board in 1903. The college offered a curriculum of music, commercial, secondary school and university transfer subjects, initially in affiliation with McGill University.
After a year in temporary premises, the college occupied its first permanent building on this site in 1904. In 1926 the Theological Department was amalgamated into St. Stephen's College on the University of Alberta campus. That same year the college expanded into a handsome gothic style building faced with tapestry brick and Indiana limestone. The building was demolished in 1961, and its successor was in turn replaced by the current structure which opened in 1993.

Canadian Consolidated Rubber Co. Building - Detail

10249 - 104 Street.
The windows on the east facade, where minimal setback was provided at the lane, offer increased fire and security protection owing to their metal sash construction and pivoting, wired glass infill panels. The west facing windows remain wooden and of double-hung sash construction.
The building's design creates a more vertical emphasis than its neighbours, with its two storey entrance and centre bay of windows located at the stair landing rather than on each floor, but the overall Commercial style facade characterizes the warehouse district.

Canadian Consolidated Rubber Co. Building

10249 - 104 Street.
January 16, 1913. The temperature plunges well below 20C. With inadequate water pressure to run their equipment, firefighters watch hopelessly as the inferno engulfs two buildings on this location and kills three people. This is one of the worst fires the city has seen, and it sparks rapid improvements in local fire safety practices.
William Allen, head of a Winnipeg investment consortium, acquired the charred site and built a replacement warehouse for the previous tenant, the Canadian Consolidated Rubber Company, in only two months. The designer and builder, the Canadian Stewart Company of Toronto, had just finished constructing the Macdonald Hotel when it installed the latest in fire safety technology in the new warehouse. Concrete encases the boiler room; metal sheaths the new fire doors; and the interior stairs feature steel risers, treads, and stringers. The windows on the east facade, where minimal setback was provided at the lane, offer increased fire and security protection owing to their metal sash construction and pivoting, wired glass infill panels. The west facing windows remain wooden and of double-hung sash construction.
The building's design creates a more vertical emphasis than its neighbours, with its two storey entrance and centre bay of windows located at the stair landing rather than on each floor, but the overall Commercial style facade characterizes the warehouse district.
This building served the rubber company until 1935, and is one of the longest-standing warehouses in the downtown core. Few significant exterior changes have been made by subsequent owners which have included the Kaufman Rubber Company, Cobogo Holdings Ltd., and the Army and Navy Department Store Holdings Ltd.

Canada Permanent Building - McLeod Building

10126 - 100 Street.
This wonderfully unique structure was built for the Canada Permanent Mortgage Corporation of Toronto. At the time it was constructed in 1910, the company was considered to be one of the oldest and largest loan institutions in Canada, and had been in Edmonton since 1901. This three storey brick and stone structure housed the company's provincial headquarters in Alberta. The building was designed by renowned architect Roland Lines and constructed by Pheasey and Batson at a cost of around $70,000.
The building was constructed of reinforced concrete and was advertised as, "the only fire-proof building in Edmonton". It featured a steel staircase and other steel fittings, including the window casements. Interiors included tile flooring, plaster columns and pilasters, enriched cornices, and oak fittings.

Canada Permanent Building

10126 - 100 Street.
This wonderfully unique structure was built for the Canada Permanent Mortgage Corporation of Toronto. At the time it was constructed in 1910, the company was considered to be one of the oldest and largest loan institutions in Canada, and had been in Edmonton since 1901. This three storey brick and stone structure housed the company's provincial headquarters in Alberta. The building was designed by renowned architect Roland Lines and constructed by Pheasey and Batson at a cost of around $70,000.
The building was constructed of reinforced concrete and was advertised as, "the only fire-proof building in Edmonton". It featured a steel staircase and other steel fittings, including the window casements. Interiors included tile flooring, plaster columns and pilasters, enriched cornices, and oak fittings.

Cecil Scott Burgess Residence / Frank Michelet Residence

10958 - 89 Avenue.
The Craftsman-style architecture represented by this house was popular in the city during the time of its construction, circa 1912. The photograph shows it as it was in 1933. Design elements include: the gable roof configuration, side dormers, central brick chimney, triangular eave brackets, wooden double-hung windows, and the hipped-roof open verandah with solid handrails. Of special note is the symmetrical arrangement of upper floor main windows and corner 'eye' windows in the front facade.
The house is significant because of its associations with Cecil Scott Burgess (1870-1971) and Percival Sidney Warren (1890-1970).
Mr. Burgess lived here from 1941. He joined the University of Alberta in 1913 when he was appointed resident architect and professor of architecture. He designed and supervised the construction of many early campus buildings including the Arts Building, Pembina Hall and the staff Ring Houses. His legacy is further evident in the Rutherford Library and the Students' Union Building, which were designed by his students. Mr. Burgess' influence was felt beyond the borders of the University of Alberta campus. He was for thirty years a member of the Council of the Alberta Association of Architects. He designed the Bowker Building and the Birks Building, recognized as significant contributions to this city's architecture.

Buena Vista Apartments - NW

12327 - 102 Avenue.
This building was constructed in 1912 as an apartment and retail complex on land purchased by a group of investors from Edmonton pioneer Malcolm Groat. These investors, collectively known as the River View Land Company, included Edmonton florist Walter Ramsay and well-known physician Dr. Edgar Allin.
Herbert Magoon and George H. Macdonald designed this three storey red brick structure. The upper floors had hardwood floors, transoms with high ceilings and natural gas fireplaces. The Edmonton Bulletin described it as, "...a most desireable residential property in the west end."
Residents of the 10 apartments likely did most of their grocery shopping at City Grocery Number 2, a major tenant on the main floor. The advertisements for the food store can still be seen on the upper wall of the south side of the building. In the 1950's an annex was built on the eastern end of the building and housed more suites and a bank.
Over the years the building has accommodated various tenants including several restaurants and drugstores. But perhaps the apartment's most famous tenant was World War I ace and legendary bush pilot Wilfrid "Wop" May.

Buena Vista Apartments - Wop May Room

12327 - 102 Avenue.
This building was constructed in 1912 as an apartment and retail complex on land purchased by a group of investors from Edmonton pioneer Malcolm Groat. These investors, collectively known as the River View Land Company, included Edmonton florist Walter Ramsay and well-known physician Dr. Edgar Allin.
Herbert Magoon and George H. Macdonald designed this three storey red brick structure. The upper floors had hardwood floors, transoms with high ceilings and natural gas fireplaces. The Edmonton Bulletin described it as, "...a most desireable residential property in the west end."
Residents of the 10 apartments likely did most of their grocery shopping at City Grocery Number 2, a major tenant on the main floor. The advertisements for the food store can still be seen on the upper wall of the south side of the building. In the 1950's an annex was built on the eastern end of the building and housed more suites and a bank.
Over the years the building has accommodated various tenants including several restaurants and drugstores. But perhaps the apartment's most famous tenant was World War I ace and legendary bush pilot Wilfrid "Wop" May.

Alberta College Entrance

In the 1860s the Reverend George MacDougall bequeathed his homestead on this site to the Methodist Church for educational and missionary purposes. Alberta College was founded by members of the MacDougall Church Board in 1903. The college offered a curriculum of music, commercial, secondary school and university transfer subjects, initially in affiliation with McGill University.
After a year in temporary premises, the college occupied its first permanent building on this site in 1904. In 1926 the Theological Department was amalgamated into St. Stephen's College on the University of Alberta campus. That same year the college expanded into a handsome gothic style building faced with tapestry brick and Indiana limestone. The building was demolished in 1961, and its successor was in turn replaced by the current structure which opened in 1993.

Buena Vista Apartments - SW

12327 - 102 Avenue.
This building was constructed in 1912 as an apartment and retail complex on land purchased by a group of investors from Edmonton pioneer Malcolm Groat. These investors, collectively known as the River View Land Company, included Edmonton florist Walter Ramsay and well-known physician Dr. Edgar Allin.
Herbert Magoon and George H. Macdonald designed this three storey red brick structure. The upper floors had hardwood floors, transoms with high ceilings and natural gas fireplaces. The Edmonton Bulletin described it as, "...a most desireable residential property in the west end."
Residents of the 10 apartments likely did most of their grocery shopping at City Grocery Number 2, a major tenant on the main floor. The advertisements for the food store can still be seen on the upper wall of the south side of the building. In the 1950's an annex was built on the eastern end of the building and housed more suites and a bank.
Over the years the building has accommodated various tenants including several restaurants and drugstores. But perhaps the apartment's most famous tenant was World War I ace and legendary bush pilot Wilfrid "Wop" May.

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