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City of Edmonton. Parks and Recreation Department fonds Houses Anglais
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Cecil Scott Burgess Residence / Frank Michelet Residence

10958 - 89 Avenue.
The Craftsman-style architecture represented by this house was popular in the city during the time of its construction, circa 1912. The photograph shows it as it was in 1933. Design elements include: the gable roof configuration, side dormers, central brick chimney, triangular eave brackets, wooden double-hung windows, and the hipped-roof open verandah with solid handrails. Of special note is the symmetrical arrangement of upper floor main windows and corner 'eye' windows in the front facade.
The house is significant because of its associations with Cecil Scott Burgess (1870-1971) and Percival Sidney Warren (1890-1970).
Mr. Burgess lived here from 1941. He joined the University of Alberta in 1913 when he was appointed resident architect and professor of architecture. He designed and supervised the construction of many early campus buildings including the Arts Building, Pembina Hall and the staff Ring Houses. His legacy is further evident in the Rutherford Library and the Students' Union Building, which were designed by his students. Mr. Burgess' influence was felt beyond the borders of the University of Alberta campus. He was for thirty years a member of the Council of the Alberta Association of Architects. He designed the Bowker Building and the Birks Building, recognized as significant contributions to this city's architecture.

Charles Barker Residence

10834 - 125 Street. Stewart Hill, of the South Side Realty Company, constructed this home around 1912. The Craftsman style house emphasized the use of natural materials and a simplistic design including elements such as the exposed wood frame construction, and timber siding and shingles. The designer emphasized earthiness and openness in contrast to the technological modernity and detailing stressed in the previous industrial era.
Charles and Mabel Barker, the first occupants of this house, moved here for only one year in 1915. At the time Charles priced hardware for Revillon Wholesale, but since emigrating from England in 1906 he also built and sold houses on the side, and the family moved between four different addresses from 1915 to 1925. Their last residence on 97 Street is similar to this one.

Charles Barker Residence

10834 - 125 Street. Stewart Hill, of the South Side Realty Company, constructed this home around 1912. The Craftsman style house emphasized the use of natural materials and a simplistic design including elements such as the exposed wood frame construction, and timber siding and shingles. The designer emphasized earthiness and openness in contrast to the technological modernity and detailing stressed in the previous industrial era.
Charles and Mabel Barker, the first occupants of this house, moved here for only one year in 1915. At the time Charles priced hardware for Revillon Wholesale, but since emigrating from England in 1906 he also built and sold houses on the side, and the family moved between four different addresses from 1915 to 1925. Their last residence on 97 Street is similar to this one.

Charles Barker Residence - South

10834 - 125 Street. Stewart Hill, of the South Side Realty Company, constructed this home around 1912. The Craftsman style house emphasized the use of natural materials and a simplistic design including elements such as the exposed wood frame construction, and timber siding and shingles. The designer emphasized earthiness and openness in contrast to the technological modernity and detailing stressed in the previous industrial era.
Charles and Mabel Barker, the first occupants of this house, moved here for only one year in 1915. At the time Charles priced hardware for Revillon Wholesale, but since emigrating from England in 1906 he also built and sold houses on the side, and the family moved between four different addresses from 1915 to 1925. Their last residence on 97 Street is similar to this one.

Charles Barker Residence - Spring

10834 - 125 Street. Stewart Hill, of the South Side Realty Company, constructed this home around 1912. The Craftsman style house emphasized the use of natural materials and a simplistic design including elements such as the exposed wood frame construction, and timber siding and shingles. The designer emphasized earthiness and openness in contrast to the technological modernity and detailing stressed in the previous industrial era.
Charles and Mabel Barker, the first occupants of this house, moved here for only one year in 1915. At the time Charles priced hardware for Revillon Wholesale, but since emigrating from England in 1906 he also built and sold houses on the side, and the family moved between four different addresses from 1915 to 1925. Their last residence on 97 Street is similar to this one.

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