Mostrar 861 resultados

Descrição arquivística
Historic buildings
Previsualizar a impressão Ver:

856 resultados com objetos digitais Mostrar resultados com objetos digitais

The Graenon - The Entrance

36 St. George's Crescent.
A popular residential landmark, "The Graenon," a Gaelic word meaning "Sunny Place," was built in 1913 - 1914 for Hannah Margaret (Fairlie) O'Connor and George Bligh O'Connor. It was the first house constructed on St. George's Crescent and the only building ever constructed by Mrs. O'Connor's brother, W. A. Fairlie, who died a few months later during World War I.
"The Graenon" is an exceptional example of domestic architecture of the time. It was designed by a group of Virginia architects under the direction of Edward Bok, the renowned editor of Ladies' Home Journal. Bok was largely responsible for defining a North America-wide stylistic revolution; one that rejected the ornate tastes of the Victorian era for simpler lines. Hence, the exterior of the house is of a Tudor Revival design, while the interior, with its quarter-sawn woodwork, reflects the then-current Arts and Crafts movement.
G. B. O'Connor was a prominent Edmonton barrister who practiced law with Major-General William A. Griesbach before becoming a judge, and later, Chief Justice of Alberta. The O'Connors entertained many of Alberta's early leaders in government and business at "The Graenon." Lieutenant Governor J. J. Bowlen was sworn into office in the front garden in 1950.
Their daughter, Peggy O'Connor Farnell, was born in the home and lived there for over eighty years. Peggy was one of Intrepid's British Security Co-Ordination agents from 1942 to 1945. In 1946, she married Gerald Farnell and they raised three sons. She then worked as a librarian at the University of Alberta for many years in addition to authoring a history of Old Glenora.
Carefully restored to its original character, the residence stands as a milestone in Alberta's early heritage. Of particular interest is a unique ornament - look for the porcelain cat, purchased by the family on a trip to Normandy. It has looked down from the roof since 1928.

The Graenon

36 St. George's Crescent.
A popular residential landmark, "The Graenon," a Gaelic word meaning "Sunny Place," was built in 1913 - 1914 for Hannah Margaret (Fairlie) O'Connor and George Bligh O'Connor. It was the first house constructed on St. George's Crescent and the only building ever constructed by Mrs. O'Connor's brother, W. A. Fairlie, who died a few months later during World War I.
"The Graenon" is an exceptional example of domestic architecture of the time. It was designed by a group of Virginia architects under the direction of Edward Bok, the renowned editor of Ladies' Home Journal. Bok was largely responsible for defining a North America-wide stylistic revolution; one that rejected the ornate tastes of the Victorian era for simpler lines. Hence, the exterior of the house is of a Tudor Revival design, while the interior, with its quarter-sawn woodwork, reflects the then-current Arts and Crafts movement.
G. B. O'Connor was a prominent Edmonton barrister who practiced law with Major-General William A. Griesbach before becoming a judge, and later, Chief Justice of Alberta. The O'Connors entertained many of Alberta's early leaders in government and business at "The Graenon." Lieutenant Governor J. J. Bowlen was sworn into office in the front garden in 1950.
Their daughter, Peggy O'Connor Farnell, was born in the home and lived there for over eighty years. Peggy was one of Intrepid's British Security Co-Ordination agents from 1942 to 1945. In 1946, she married Gerald Farnell and they raised three sons. She then worked as a librarian at the University of Alberta for many years in addition to authoring a history of Old Glenora.
Carefully restored to its original character, the residence stands as a milestone in Alberta's early heritage. Of particular interest is a unique ornament - look for the porcelain cat, purchased by the family on a trip to Normandy. It has looked down from the roof since 1928.

Beth Israel Synagogue - NE

10103 - 95 Street. Originally, this church was the first synagogue in Edmonton, though the Jewish community held religious services for seventeen years prior to the synagogue being built. The lot for the synagogue was donated by William Diamond. The builder was A.E. Simpson. The first President of the Beth Israel Synagogue was Abraham Cristall. Rabbi Hyman Goldstick served the congregation as the first Rabbi. From 1911 until 1952 this synagogue was the centre for the Jewish community's religious, social and cultural life. After a new Beth Israel Synagogue was built this building was used by the Third Christian Reformed Church and the Wells of Joy Gospel Centre. Since 1958 it has been the place of worship for the St. Boniface Catholic Church Congregation.

Dr. Terwillegar Residence

10727 - 125 Street.
James Carruthers purchased much of Malcolm Groat's homestead in the early 1900s. He subdivided the land, determined that Westmount would be a trimmed down extension of Glenora, the prestigious neighbourhood nearby. The communities attracted businessmen, professionals, and their families in record numbers. Westmount grew to be the greatest concentration of single family dwellings in Edmonton at the time.
Architect John Martland designed this home for Charles W. Coppock in 1912 on one of the first lots to be developed in the new community. The artful simplicity, efficient use of space, extensive use of natural wood, and open eaves exemplify this Craftsman bungalow, although it remains distinct in its inclusion of a hipped rather than gabled roof. Martland later became the city architect, designing the Edmonton Municipal Golf Course, the City Market, and two hangars at the Municipal Airport.
The physician and surgeon, Dr. Norman Terwillegar, his wife Dorothy, and their three children moved to this home in 1920. Terwillegar earned a city-wide reputation for his devotion to his patients at the Royal Alexandra Hospital and in his private practice, based from his home later in his career. In tribute to the good doctor's character and influence in his practice, and during his tenures as president of the Edmonton Academy of Medicine and the Alberta Medical Society, the city named a southwestern community Terwillegar Heights in the 1960s. Dr. Terwillegar died in 1948. This house remained his family's home until 1959.

Strathcona Library

8331 - 104 Street.
"A fine new south side library" proclaimed the Daily Capital in June 1912, as construction began on what is now Edmonton's oldest library building. Designed by the architectural firm of Arthur G. Wilson and David E. Herrald, the Strathcona Public Library is a solidly built edifice of press brick trimmed with Roman stone. It opened to the public on March 14, 1913.
This landmark building, built in the English Renaissance Revival Style, is finished in weathered orange brick with limestone embellishments. It is believed that the brick was manufactured at one of several brickyards that flourished in Edmonton's river valley at the turn of the 20th century. Interior features include arched entryways and wood carved banisters. When built, books were stored only on the main floor. The basement was devoted to a men's reading room, while the second floor auditorium was a community focal point where meetings of the Edmonton Medical Association and the Ladies Hospital League were held. It was also the site of local community theatre productions and college graduation exercises.

Strathcona Hotel

10302 - 82 Avenue.
In 1891 the Calgary and Edmonton Railway completed its line and built a station just south of the river adjacent to what is now Whyte Avenue. Travelers to the Edmonton area needed accommodation nearby, so the railway company built what was for the time a large and modern hotel of 45 rooms to meet this demand. Initially called the Edmonton Hotel, it was renamed the Strathcona Hotel in 1899 when the settlement on the south bank of the river was organized as the Town of Strathcona.
The hotel was very popular and in 1903 a two storey annex was built followed by an even larger three storey addistion to the north of the original building in 1907. Alberta's adoption of Prohibition in 1916 hit many hotels hard and the Strathcona was no exception. With no tavern revenue to help support the business, profits dropped and the hotel struggled. Somewhat surprisingly, the Presbyterian Church of Canada took over the building. It was used first for the Westminster Ladies College from 1918 to 1924 and later as the Westminster Residence for Girls.
The Presbyterian Church acquired the entire hotel through a foreclosure in 1923 before reselling it to private investors in 1928. The repeal of Prohibition in 1923 made hotels like the Strathcona profitable again and by 1928-1929 the Strathcona was back in business as a hotel.
The heritage value of the Strathcona Hotel lies in its close association with the early development of Edmonton and Strathcona. It is also the oldest surviving wood frame commercial building on Whyte Avenue and one of Edmonton's most distinctive landmarks.

Strathcona Hotel

10302 - 82 Avenue.
In 1891 the Calgary and Edmonton Railway completed its line and built a station just south of the river adjacent to what is now Whyte Avenue. Travelers to the Edmonton area needed accommodation nearby, so the railway company built what was for the time a large and modern hotel of 45 rooms to meet this demand. Initially called the Edmonton Hotel, it was renamed the Strathcona Hotel in 1899 when the settlement on the south bank of the river was organized as the Town of Strathcona.
The hotel was very popular and in 1903 a two storey annex was built followed by an even larger three storey addistion to the north of the original building in 1907. Alberta's adoption of Prohibition in 1916 hit many hotels hard and the Strathcona was no exception. With no tavern revenue to help support the business, profits dropped and the hotel struggled. Somewhat surprisingly, the Presbyterian Church of Canada took over the building. It was used first for the Westminster Ladies College from 1918 to 1924 and later as the Westminster Residence for Girls.
The Presbyterian Church acquired the entire hotel through a foreclosure in 1923 before reselling it to private investors in 1928. The repeal of Prohibition in 1923 made hotels like the Strathcona profitable again and by 1928-1929 the Strathcona was back in business as a hotel.
The heritage value of the Strathcona Hotel lies in its close association with the early development of Edmonton and Strathcona. It is also the oldest surviving wood frame commercial building on Whyte Avenue and one of Edmonton's most distinctive landmarks.

Beth Israel Synagogue - NE

10103 - 95 Street. Originally, this church was the first synagogue in Edmonton, though the Jewish community held religious services for seventeen years prior to the synagogue being built. The lot for the synagogue was donated by William Diamond. The builder was A.E. Simpson. The first President of the Beth Israel Synagogue was Abraham Cristall. Rabbi Hyman Goldstick served the congregation as the first Rabbi. From 1911 until 1952 this synagogue was the centre for the Jewish community's religious, social and cultural life. After a new Beth Israel Synagogue was built this building was used by the Third Christian Reformed Church and the Wells of Joy Gospel Centre. Since 1958 it has been the place of worship for the St. Boniface Catholic Church Congregation.

Strathcona High School - E

10523 - 84 Avenue.
This structure was built in 1909 by the newly incorporated city of Strathcona. From the time when it was opened officially by Alberta's first premier, the Hon. A.C. Rutherford, it served generations of scholars. University classes were held here for two and a half years.

Strathcona High School - NE

10523 - 84 Avenue.
This structure was built in 1909 by the newly incorporated city of Strathcona. From the time when it was opened officially by Alberta's first premier, the Hon. A.C. Rutherford, it served generations of scholars. University classes were held here for two and a half years.

Resultados 61 a 70 de 861