Showing 861 results

Archivistische beschrijving
Historic buildings
Print preview View:

856 results with digital objects Show results with digital objects

Strathcona High School

10523 - 84 Avenue.
This structure was built in 1909 by the newly incorporated city of Strathcona. From the time when it was opened officially by Alberta's first premier, the Hon. A.C. Rutherford, it served generations of scholars. University classes were held here for two and a half years.

Strathcona Fire Hall 1

10323 - 83 Avenue.
Originally known as Strathcona Fire Hall Number 1, this structure is the last remaining example of a pre-First World War fire hall in Edmonton. Designed by Arthur G. Wilson and David E. Herrald, the hall was built by contractor James M. Eaton at a cost of $15,000. The hall was described at the time of construction as "unusually commodious".
Constructed of brick with stone quoins, cornices and a concrete floor the building also had a parapet which was demolished at a later date. Dominating the front of the building are three main doors decorated by radiating stone voussoirs. The bell tower measures 11 sq. ft. (1.02 sq. m.) and rises to a height of 77 ft. (23.4 m.), which enabled the fire hoses to be properly racked. In the original design the second storey held the fire chief's office and bedroom along with five bedrooms and a band room which took up almost half the space on that floor.
Following the amalgamation with Edmonton in 1912, Fire Hall Number 1 became Fire Hall Number 6 and remained in service until 1954. The building was then leased to Strathcona Furniture for 20 years until it became home to Walterdale Theatre in 1974.

Strathcona Fire Hall 1 - Rear

10323 - 83 Avenue.
Originally known as Strathcona Fire Hall Number 1, this structure is the last remaining example of a pre-First World War fire hall in Edmonton. Designed by Arthur G. Wilson and David E. Herrald, the hall was built by contractor James M. Eaton at a cost of $15,000. The hall was described at the time of construction as "unusually commodious".
Constructed of brick with stone quoins, cornices and a concrete floor the building also had a parapet which was demolished at a later date. Dominating the front of the building are three main doors decorated by radiating stone voussoirs. The bell tower measures 11 sq. ft. (1.02 sq. m.) and rises to a height of 77 ft. (23.4 m.), which enabled the fire hoses to be properly racked. In the original design the second storey held the fire chief's office and bedroom along with five bedrooms and a band room which took up almost half the space on that floor.
Following the amalgamation with Edmonton in 1912, Fire Hall Number 1 became Fire Hall Number 6 and remained in service until 1954. The building was then leased to Strathcona Furniture for 20 years until it became home to Walterdale Theatre in 1974.

Strathcona Fire Hall 1

10323 - 83 Avenue.
Originally known as Strathcona Fire Hall Number 1, this structure is the last remaining example of a pre-First World War fire hall in Edmonton. Designed by Arthur G. Wilson and David E. Herrald, the hall was built by contractor James M. Eaton at a cost of $15,000. The hall was described at the time of construction as "unusually commodious".
Constructed of brick with stone quoins, cornices and a concrete floor the building also had a parapet which was demolished at a later date. Dominating the front of the building are three main doors decorated by radiating stone voussoirs. The bell tower measures 11 sq. ft. (1.02 sq. m.) and rises to a height of 77 ft. (23.4 m.), which enabled the fire hoses to be properly racked. In the original design the second storey held the fire chief's office and bedroom along with five bedrooms and a band room which took up almost half the space on that floor.
Following the amalgamation with Edmonton in 1912, Fire Hall Number 1 became Fire Hall Number 6 and remained in service until 1954. The building was then leased to Strathcona Furniture for 20 years until it became home to Walterdale Theatre in 1974.

Strathcona Community

10139 - 87 Avenue. Strathcona Community Hall.
Strathcona is unusual in Alberta because it has been recognized by both the provincial and municipal governments as a heritage district. These designations are centered on the community's commercial core of Whyte Avenue between 102 and 106 Streets. The surrounding residential area, however, is no less historically interesting and is a fine example of a late 19th and early 20th century urban neighbourhood.
Strathcona is a product of railway development. In 1883 the Canadian Pacific Railway reached what would become Alberta along a southern route from Medicine Hat to Calgary. The Edmonton area would not be connected to the transcontinental railway system until a CPR subsidiary, the Calgary and Edmonton Railway was completed to the south bank of the river in 1891. The costs of bridging the river were too great at the time, so a new community grew up on the south bank of the river at the "end of steel."
Initially called South Edmonton, in 1896 the community was renamed Strathcona in honour of Sir Donald Smith, Lord Strathcona, a leading figure in the Hudson's Bay and Canadian Pacific Railway companies. The CPR developed the townsite on portions of River Lots 15 and 17 and centred it around the rail yards and station, grain elevators and a commercial district on Whyte Avenue. By 1911, Strathcona had a population of 5579 people and on Whyte Avenue. By 1911, Strathcona had a separate town council, school, churches, businesses and residential areas. It was also home to the University of Alberta, built on the western edge of the growing community.
By the early 1900s, Edmonton and Strathcona were connected by bridge, ferry and even after 1902 a railway. In 1912, the two were united into a single city. However, Strathcona retained its distinctive historical character and a fine collection of commercial, institutional and residential buildings that reflect the community's origins as a late 19th century town.

Strathcona Community

10139 - 87 Avenue. Strathcona Community Hall.
Strathcona is unusual in Alberta because it has been recognized by both the provincial and municipal governments as a heritage district. These designations are centered on the community's commercial core of Whyte Avenue between 102 and 106 Streets. The surrounding residential area, however, is no less historically interesting and is a fine example of a late 19th and early 20th century urban neighbourhood.
Strathcona is a product of railway development. In 1883 the Canadian Pacific Railway reached what would become Alberta along a southern route from Medicine Hat to Calgary. The Edmonton area would not be connected to the transcontinental railway system until a CPR subsidiary, the Calgary and Edmonton Railway was completed to the south bank of the river in 1891. The costs of bridging the river were too great at the time, so a new community grew up on the south bank of the river at the "end of steel."
Initially called South Edmonton, in 1896 the community was renamed Strathcona in honour of Sir Donald Smith, Lord Strathcona, a leading figure in the Hudson's Bay and Canadian Pacific Railway companies. The CPR developed the townsite on portions of River Lots 15 and 17 and centred it around the rail yards and station, grain elevators and a commercial district on Whyte Avenue. By 1911, Strathcona had a population of 5579 people and on Whyte Avenue. By 1911, Strathcona had a separate town council, school, churches, businesses and residential areas. It was also home to the University of Alberta, built on the western edge of the growing community.
By the early 1900s, Edmonton and Strathcona were connected by bridge, ferry and even after 1902 a railway. In 1912, the two were united into a single city. However, Strathcona retained its distinctive historical character and a fine collection of commercial, institutional and residential buildings that reflect the community's origins as a late 19th century town.

Strathcona Community

10139 - 87 Avenue. Strathcona Community Hall.
Strathcona is unusual in Alberta because it has been recognized by both the provincial and municipal governments as a heritage district. These designations are centered on the community's commercial core of Whyte Avenue between 102 and 106 Streets. The surrounding residential area, however, is no less historically interesting and is a fine example of a late 19th and early 20th century urban neighbourhood.
Strathcona is a product of railway development. In 1883 the Canadian Pacific Railway reached what would become Alberta along a southern route from Medicine Hat to Calgary. The Edmonton area would not be connected to the transcontinental railway system until a CPR subsidiary, the Calgary and Edmonton Railway was completed to the south bank of the river in 1891. The costs of bridging the river were too great at the time, so a new community grew up on the south bank of the river at the "end of steel."
Initially called South Edmonton, in 1896 the community was renamed Strathcona in honour of Sir Donald Smith, Lord Strathcona, a leading figure in the Hudson's Bay and Canadian Pacific Railway companies. The CPR developed the townsite on portions of River Lots 15 and 17 and centred it around the rail yards and station, grain elevators and a commercial district on Whyte Avenue. By 1911, Strathcona had a population of 5579 people and on Whyte Avenue. By 1911, Strathcona had a separate town council, school, churches, businesses and residential areas. It was also home to the University of Alberta, built on the western edge of the growing community.
By the early 1900s, Edmonton and Strathcona were connected by bridge, ferry and even after 1902 a railway. In 1912, the two were united into a single city. However, Strathcona retained its distinctive historical character and a fine collection of commercial, institutional and residential buildings that reflect the community's origins as a late 19th century town.

St. Stephen's College

8820 - 112 Street.
For over sixty years St. Stephen's (originally Alberta College), the first denominational college completed in 1910 on Methodist church property on the campus, subsidized scores of deserving students who repaid its generosity by playing rewarding roles in Canada's development.

St. Joseph's Hospital - SW

10728 - 82 Avenue.
When this elegant brick and stone building opened in January 1948, newspapers hailed it as one of the most modern hospitals in Canada. Costing around $700,000, not including furnishings, the four-storey building was originally designed to hold six storeys. A hospital has been situated on this block since 1929 when the Sisters of Providence of St. Vincent de Paul purchased the old Whyte Block, located on the eastern corner of this property, and turned it into a hospital for the aged.
Over the years the building was known by many names such as House of Providence Home, St. Joseph's Hospital for Incurables, and finally, St. Joseph's Auxiliary Hospital. Through it all, the Sisters performed loving, caring treatment for many patients either terminally ill or severely disabled. In 1955 an additional two storeys were added. In 1963 the Whyte Block was demolished and an auditorium was added to the west and a Sisters' residence to the east. The hospital closed in 1993 as the Sisters relocated to a site in the southern part of the city.
After sitting vacant for several years the building underwent a dramatic renovation and was re-born in 1997 as the Garneau Lofts.

St. Joseph's Hospital - Chapel Window

10728 - 82 Avenue.
When this elegant brick and stone building opened in January 1948, newspapers hailed it as one of the most modern hospitals in Canada. Costing around $700,000, not including furnishings, the four-storey building was originally designed to hold six storeys. A hospital has been situated on this block since 1929 when the Sisters of Providence of St. Vincent de Paul purchased the old Whyte Block, located on the eastern corner of this property, and turned it into a hospital for the aged.
Over the years the building was known by many names such as House of Providence Home, St. Joseph's Hospital for Incurables, and finally, St. Joseph's Auxiliary Hospital. Through it all, the Sisters performed loving, caring treatment for many patients either terminally ill or severely disabled. In 1955 an additional two storeys were added. In 1963 the Whyte Block was demolished and an auditorium was added to the west and a Sisters' residence to the east. The hospital closed in 1993 as the Sisters relocated to a site in the southern part of the city.
After sitting vacant for several years the building underwent a dramatic renovation and was re-born in 1997 as the Garneau Lofts.

Resultaten 71 tot 80 van 861