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City of Edmonton. Parks and Recreation Department fonds Houses Anglais
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Trudel Residence - SE

8134 Jasper Avenue.
Richard Blakey, Alberta's provincial architect from 1912 to 1924, designed this clinker brick house in 1928. This home was one of Blakey's few residential commissions as a private architect. The Trudel Residence is noted for its unique architecture, a mixture of styles carefully proportioned and designed to take advantage of the views over the North Saskatchewan River valley. The interior has three fireplaces, original hardwood floors, ceramic tile and double French doors.
The building's original owner, Ludger Trudel, lived here from 1928 to 1932. He was a local furrier who traded and manufactured fur products for local and regional markets. Nicknamed Edmonton's "Buffalo King," he paid for the house using proceeds from the sale of buffalo coats to the R.C.M.P.
The Trudel Residence is valued as representative of the quality of houses built for locally successful entrepreneurs and civic leaders. The neighbourhood's proximity to Edmonton's former commercial core, east of the present downtown, and its attractive setting encouraged affluent families to settle here prior to the Second World War. Notable for its high quality of construction, the house is one of the best preserved homes in the area.

Trudel Residence - SW

8134 Jasper Avenue.
Richard Blakey, Alberta's provincial architect from 1912 to 1924, designed this clinker brick house in 1928. This home was one of Blakey's few residential commissions as a private architect. The Trudel Residence is noted for its unique architecture, a mixture of styles carefully proportioned and designed to take advantage of the views over the North Saskatchewan River valley. The interior has three fireplaces, original hardwood floors, ceramic tile and double French doors.
The building's original owner, Ludger Trudel, lived here from 1928 to 1932. He was a local furrier who traded and manufactured fur products for local and regional markets. Nicknamed Edmonton's "Buffalo King," he paid for the house using proceeds from the sale of buffalo coats to the R.C.M.P.
The Trudel Residence is valued as representative of the quality of houses built for locally successful entrepreneurs and civic leaders. The neighbourhood's proximity to Edmonton's former commercial core, east of the present downtown, and its attractive setting encouraged affluent families to settle here prior to the Second World War. Notable for its high quality of construction, the house is one of the best preserved homes in the area.

Trudel Residence

8134 Jasper Avenue.
Richard Blakey, Alberta's provincial architect from 1912 to 1924, designed this clinker brick house in 1928. This home was one of Blakey's few residential commissions as a private architect. The Trudel Residence is noted for its unique architecture, a mixture of styles carefully proportioned and designed to take advantage of the views over the North Saskatchewan River valley. The interior has three fireplaces, original hardwood floors, ceramic tile and double French doors.
The building's original owner, Ludger Trudel, lived here from 1928 to 1932. He was a local furrier who traded and manufactured fur products for local and regional markets. Nicknamed Edmonton's "Buffalo King," he paid for the house using proceeds from the sale of buffalo coats to the R.C.M.P.
The Trudel Residence is valued as representative of the quality of houses built for locally successful entrepreneurs and civic leaders. The neighbourhood's proximity to Edmonton's former commercial core, east of the present downtown, and its attractive setting encouraged affluent families to settle here prior to the Second World War. Notable for its high quality of construction, the house is one of the best preserved homes in the area.

Birks Building - NW

900 - 10310 Jasper Avenue. Henry Birks and Sons began their business in Montreal in 1879. They were descendants of a family of silversmiths who had practiced their trade in England since the 15th century. In 1927, Birks bought the successful jewelry store owned by D.A. Kirkland, the "Diamond Prince of Edmonton". The Birks building was designed by Montreal architects Nobbs and Hyde and built by local contractor H.G. MacDonald at a cost of $350,000. Over five thousand people attended the opening of the store in November, 1929. The store featured 200 feet of counters and large display windows.
This building and the one in Montreal are the only original Birks buildings still standing in Canada.
The first two floors of the building are fronted with Tennessee marble. This marble is faced by buff and red Flemish bond brick and trimmed with squares of mosaic tile decoration and patterned metal panels. In keeping with company policy across Canada, Birks reserved most of the office space in the upper floors for medical and dental offices, as a public service. This was the first building in Edmonton which was designed especially for medical offices, incorporating features suggested by doctors.

Richard Wallace Residence

10950 - 81 Street.
Battle-weary soldiers returned home from the First World War to face an economic slump and widespread unemployment. Reunited families desperately sought the social stability and comfort that comes from simple family living. Defying the elaborate Victorian styles of the turn of the 20th century, the Craftsman-style homes that emerged in Edmonton's neighbourhoods in the 1910s and 1920s emphasized a longing for hominess and family virtues.
Built in 1923 and named after one of its earliest occupants, the Richard Wallace Residence exemplifies Craftsman qualities with its simple, meaningful design. The interior emphasizes form and function, with space conservatively and creatively fashioned for everyday living.
Richard Wallace, a registrar, sheriff, and clerk of the Supreme Court of Alberta resided here from 1925 until 1943.

Richard Wallace Residence

10950 - 81 Street.
Battle-weary soldiers returned home from the First World War to face an economic slump and widespread unemployment. Reunited families desperately sought the social stability and comfort that comes from simple family living. Defying the elaborate Victorian styles of the turn of the 20th century, the Craftsman-style homes that emerged in Edmonton's neighbourhoods in the 1910s and 1920s emphasized a longing for hominess and family virtues.
Built in 1923 and named after one of its earliest occupants, the Richard Wallace Residence exemplifies Craftsman qualities with its simple, meaningful design. The interior emphasizes form and function, with space conservatively and creatively fashioned for everyday living.
Richard Wallace, a registrar, sheriff, and clerk of the Supreme Court of Alberta resided here from 1925 until 1943.

William Blakey Residence

13526 - 101 Avenue. William Blakey was one of Edmonton's most influential architects. He arrived in Edmonton in 1907 following his brother and fellow architect, Richard to the rapidly growing city. While Richard rose to become Provincial Architect from 1912 to 1924, William worked mostly in private practice.
He designed this house for his family in 1946 to reflect his advocacy of slab grade construction and other innovations in construction methods and materials. It features a symmetrical plan with a flat roof, large overhanging eaves, corner windows, and unornamented wall surfaces. These are all characteristic of the International style.

William Blakey Residence

13526 - 101 Avenue. William Blakey was one of Edmonton's most influential architects. He arrived in Edmonton in 1907 following his brother and fellow architect, Richard to the rapidly growing city. While Richard rose to become Provincial Architect from 1912 to 1924, William worked mostly in private practice.
He designed this house for his family in 1946 to reflect his advocacy of slab grade construction and other innovations in construction methods and materials. It features a symmetrical plan with a flat roof, large overhanging eaves, corner windows, and unornamented wall surfaces. These are all characteristic of the International style.

Cecil Scott Burgess Residence / Frank Michelet Residence

10958 - 89 Avenue.
The Craftsman-style architecture represented by this house was popular in the city during the time of its construction, circa 1912. The photograph shows it as it was in 1933. Design elements include: the gable roof configuration, side dormers, central brick chimney, triangular eave brackets, wooden double-hung windows, and the hipped-roof open verandah with solid handrails. Of special note is the symmetrical arrangement of upper floor main windows and corner 'eye' windows in the front facade.
The house is significant because of its associations with Cecil Scott Burgess (1870-1971) and Percival Sidney Warren (1890-1970).
Mr. Burgess lived here from 1941. He joined the University of Alberta in 1913 when he was appointed resident architect and professor of architecture. He designed and supervised the construction of many early campus buildings including the Arts Building, Pembina Hall and the staff Ring Houses. His legacy is further evident in the Rutherford Library and the Students' Union Building, which were designed by his students. Mr. Burgess' influence was felt beyond the borders of the University of Alberta campus. He was for thirty years a member of the Council of the Alberta Association of Architects. He designed the Bowker Building and the Birks Building, recognized as significant contributions to this city's architecture.

Charles J. Carter Residence

10603 - 103 Street
Charles J. Carter constructed this home in 1907. Similar to single-family dwellings built by other Edmonton entrepreneurs at the time, his house features a wooden frame, lapped wood siding, and a front veranda with turned porch columns.
The City relocated the Carter residence and stable from their original location at 54 Heiminck Street (10002-107 Avenue) to this spot in 1995 as a tribute to a time when horses, pigs, and chickens were more common in Edmonton yards than Fords, Toyotas, and Jeeps.
Carter worked as a contractor, blacksmith, and packer for the furniture company Blowey-Henry, and although his name graces this home, he only lived here for a short time. Others enjoyed the home for many long years. Residents included the baker, Charles W. Campbell; a retired couple, James and Mary Gauld; the men of the Men's Co-operative Residence here in the 1950s; and the longest-staying occupant, Martha Pehl, an employee of McGavin's bakery before her retirement.

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