Print preview Close

Showing 861 results

Archivistische beschrijving
Historic buildings
Print preview View:

856 results with digital objects Show results with digital objects

Birks Building - NW

900 - 10310 Jasper Avenue. Henry Birks and Sons began their business in Montreal in 1879. They were descendants of a family of silversmiths who had practiced their trade in England since the 15th century. In 1927, Birks bought the successful jewelry store owned by D.A. Kirkland, the "Diamond Prince of Edmonton". The Birks building was designed by Montreal architects Nobbs and Hyde and built by local contractor H.G. MacDonald at a cost of $350,000. Over five thousand people attended the opening of the store in November, 1929. The store featured 200 feet of counters and large display windows.
This building and the one in Montreal are the only original Birks buildings still standing in Canada.
The first two floors of the building are fronted with Tennessee marble. This marble is faced by buff and red Flemish bond brick and trimmed with squares of mosaic tile decoration and patterned metal panels. In keeping with company policy across Canada, Birks reserved most of the office space in the upper floors for medical and dental offices, as a public service. This was the first building in Edmonton which was designed especially for medical offices, incorporating features suggested by doctors.

A. MacDonald Building

10128 - 105 Avenue. The A. Macdonald Building is historically significant for the role it played in the history of the storage and cartage of wholesale grocery goods in Edmonton from its beginnings up to the mid-twentieth century. Constructed in 1913-14, it was named for Alexander Macdonald, president of the A. Macdonald Company of Winnipeg, whose Edmonton branch became one of the three largest grocery suppliers in northern Alberta. The A. Macdonald Building has an historical association with four interrelated firms - the A. Macdonald Company, H.H. Cooper and Company, Macdonald-Cooper Ltd. and Macdonald's Consolidated Limited.

Trudel Residence

8134 Jasper Avenue.
Richard Blakey, Alberta's provincial architect from 1912 to 1924, designed this clinker brick house in 1928. This home was one of Blakey's few residential commissions as a private architect. The Trudel Residence is noted for its unique architecture, a mixture of styles carefully proportioned and designed to take advantage of the views over the North Saskatchewan River valley. The interior has three fireplaces, original hardwood floors, ceramic tile and double French doors.
The building's original owner, Ludger Trudel, lived here from 1928 to 1932. He was a local furrier who traded and manufactured fur products for local and regional markets. Nicknamed Edmonton's "Buffalo King," he paid for the house using proceeds from the sale of buffalo coats to the R.C.M.P.
The Trudel Residence is valued as representative of the quality of houses built for locally successful entrepreneurs and civic leaders. The neighbourhood's proximity to Edmonton's former commercial core, east of the present downtown, and its attractive setting encouraged affluent families to settle here prior to the Second World War. Notable for its high quality of construction, the house is one of the best preserved homes in the area.

Trudel Residence - SW

8134 Jasper Avenue.
Richard Blakey, Alberta's provincial architect from 1912 to 1924, designed this clinker brick house in 1928. This home was one of Blakey's few residential commissions as a private architect. The Trudel Residence is noted for its unique architecture, a mixture of styles carefully proportioned and designed to take advantage of the views over the North Saskatchewan River valley. The interior has three fireplaces, original hardwood floors, ceramic tile and double French doors.
The building's original owner, Ludger Trudel, lived here from 1928 to 1932. He was a local furrier who traded and manufactured fur products for local and regional markets. Nicknamed Edmonton's "Buffalo King," he paid for the house using proceeds from the sale of buffalo coats to the R.C.M.P.
The Trudel Residence is valued as representative of the quality of houses built for locally successful entrepreneurs and civic leaders. The neighbourhood's proximity to Edmonton's former commercial core, east of the present downtown, and its attractive setting encouraged affluent families to settle here prior to the Second World War. Notable for its high quality of construction, the house is one of the best preserved homes in the area.

Trudel Residence - SE

8134 Jasper Avenue.
Richard Blakey, Alberta's provincial architect from 1912 to 1924, designed this clinker brick house in 1928. This home was one of Blakey's few residential commissions as a private architect. The Trudel Residence is noted for its unique architecture, a mixture of styles carefully proportioned and designed to take advantage of the views over the North Saskatchewan River valley. The interior has three fireplaces, original hardwood floors, ceramic tile and double French doors.
The building's original owner, Ludger Trudel, lived here from 1928 to 1932. He was a local furrier who traded and manufactured fur products for local and regional markets. Nicknamed Edmonton's "Buffalo King," he paid for the house using proceeds from the sale of buffalo coats to the R.C.M.P.
The Trudel Residence is valued as representative of the quality of houses built for locally successful entrepreneurs and civic leaders. The neighbourhood's proximity to Edmonton's former commercial core, east of the present downtown, and its attractive setting encouraged affluent families to settle here prior to the Second World War. Notable for its high quality of construction, the house is one of the best preserved homes in the area.

Trinity Lutheran Church - S

10014 - 81 Avenue.
In 1902 a group of enterprising Lutheran families who had settled in Strathcona, formed their own congregation and built on this site the first Lutheran Church in the Edmonton area.
In 1914 the present building was erected to accommodate the ever-increasing congregation, and several additions have been made to the building over the years.
Throughout its long history as a church in this area, Trinity Lutheran has also been a focal point for many community services and activities.

Trinity Lutheran Church - SE

10014 - 81 Avenue.
In 1902 a group of enterprising Lutheran families who had settled in Strathcona, formed their own congregation and built on this site the first Lutheran Church in the Edmonton area.
In 1914 the present building was erected to accommodate the ever-increasing congregation, and several additions have been made to the building over the years.
Throughout its long history as a church in this area, Trinity Lutheran has also been a focal point for many community services and activities.

Tipton Block

10355 - 82 Avenue.
The Tipton Block was built in 1911 for R.A. Hulbert, a local businessman. The building was sold in 1912 to J.G. Tipton & Sons, Strathcona's oldest real estate firm. John Gaddis Tipton, the firm's principal, was a lawyer and alderman who promoted the amalgamation of the Cities of Edmonton and Strathcona in 1911.
The main floor was used for commercial purposes while the second and third floors contained offices. The building has been occupied by Drs. Marion and Toombs, dentists, Essery & Co. Men's Wear, and Bailey & Ferguson Real Estate, among others.
After years of disuse, the Tipton Block became a restoration project of the Old Strathcona Foundation. It was re-opened on October 4, 1979.

The Old Citadel

10030 - 102 Street.
The Old Citadel was constructed for the Salvation Army in 1925 and was designed by Magoon and MacDonald, Architects. Herbert Alton Magoon (1863 - 1941), a Quebec architect, arrived in Edmonton with George Heath MacDonald (1883 - 1961) in 1904. In 1911 MacDonald became Magoon's partner, and their firm built many of the major public buildings in Edmonton, including MacDougall United Church, the Tegler Building, Public Library Building, Federal Building and General Hospital.
In 1886 Staff-Captain Arthur Young first visited Edmonton for the Salvation Army. By 1925 the Army was becoming one of the city's leading social service agencies. In that year it opened Grace Hospital and the following year its first seniors home in Canada, the Bonnie Doon Eventide Home for Men, under the direction of Staff-Captain Sutherland Steward, was opened.
From 1964 until 1976 the fledgling Citadel Theatre operated in this building and in the loft of an adjacent building. In 1978 the Citadel was remodeled and put to commercial use, following the Theatre's move to its new location in 1976.

The Graenon - Window Detail

36 St. George's Crescent.
A popular residential landmark, "The Graenon," a Gaelic word meaning "Sunny Place," was built in 1913 - 1914 for Hannah Margaret (Fairlie) O'Connor and George Bligh O'Connor. It was the first house constructed on St. George's Crescent and the only building ever constructed by Mrs. O'Connor's brother, W. A. Fairlie, who died a few months later during World War I.
"The Graenon" is an exceptional example of domestic architecture of the time. It was designed by a group of Virginia architects under the direction of Edward Bok, the renowned editor of Ladies' Home Journal. Bok was largely responsible for defining a North America-wide stylistic revolution; one that rejected the ornate tastes of the Victorian era for simpler lines. Hence, the exterior of the house is of a Tudor Revival design, while the interior, with its quarter-sawn woodwork, reflects the then-current Arts and Crafts movement.
G. B. O'Connor was a prominent Edmonton barrister who practiced law with Major-General William A. Griesbach before becoming a judge, and later, Chief Justice of Alberta. The O'Connors entertained many of Alberta's early leaders in government and business at "The Graenon." Lieutenant Governor J. J. Bowlen was sworn into office in the front garden in 1950.
Their daughter, Peggy O'Connor Farnell, was born in the home and lived there for over eighty years. Peggy was one of Intrepid's British Security Co-Ordination agents from 1942 to 1945. In 1946, she married Gerald Farnell and they raised three sons. She then worked as a librarian at the University of Alberta for many years in addition to authoring a history of Old Glenora.
Carefully restored to its original character, the residence stands as a milestone in Alberta's early heritage. Of particular interest is a unique ornament - look for the porcelain cat, purchased by the family on a trip to Normandy. It has looked down from the roof since 1928.

Resultaten 51 tot 60 van 861