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City of Edmonton. Parks and Recreation Department fonds Houses Anglais
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John Ross Residence

9904 - 106 Street.
This brick home was built in 1912 by John W. Ross. Born in Pictou County, N.S., John Ross learned the building trade before moving west. After unsuccessful ranching in Manitoba, he helped build the R.N.W.M.P. Headquarters in Regina. In 1887 John Ross became Indian Agent at Hobbema, and in 1890 moved to Saddle Lake as Farm Instructor and Agent. 1900 he entered the real estate business in Edmonton, retiring 1913 to the Coast because of his wife's ill-health.
He was known as a trim dresser, always wearing a stiff starched collar, and drove an electric 2-door brougham roadster with a steering bar.
The Alberta government took over the home in 1957, and the Alano Fellowship Club took up residency. When the interior was badly gutted by fire in 1976, members of the Alano Club volunteered their time in restoring the interior.

Charles Barker Residence

10834 - 125 Street. Stewart Hill, of the South Side Realty Company, constructed this home around 1912. The Craftsman style house emphasized the use of natural materials and a simplistic design including elements such as the exposed wood frame construction, and timber siding and shingles. The designer emphasized earthiness and openness in contrast to the technological modernity and detailing stressed in the previous industrial era.
Charles and Mabel Barker, the first occupants of this house, moved here for only one year in 1915. At the time Charles priced hardware for Revillon Wholesale, but since emigrating from England in 1906 he also built and sold houses on the side, and the family moved between four different addresses from 1915 to 1925. Their last residence on 97 Street is similar to this one.

Reginald G.J. Smith Residence

9824 - 92 Avenue.
This residence is typical of housing built in the Mill Creek area of Strathcona in the pre-First World War boom period. It was built in 1913 by James Turner, one of the most prolific builders in the area. Turner built a number of houses on 92 and 93 Avenues at this time to meet the demand for housing in the growing city.
The house was sold to Reginald G. J. Smith in 1914. Smith worked first as a reporter for the Edmonton Journal, then as a printer. From the late 1910s through to the 1960s the house was occupied by a wide variety of people including a railway engineer, a managing director of furniture company, and an accountant, but for most of these years it was home to a widow named Mrs. Winifred Fairley.
Together with other residences on the block it offers a sense of the residential streetscape of a pre- 1914 Edmonton neighbourhood.

Charles Barker Residence - South

10834 - 125 Street. Stewart Hill, of the South Side Realty Company, constructed this home around 1912. The Craftsman style house emphasized the use of natural materials and a simplistic design including elements such as the exposed wood frame construction, and timber siding and shingles. The designer emphasized earthiness and openness in contrast to the technological modernity and detailing stressed in the previous industrial era.
Charles and Mabel Barker, the first occupants of this house, moved here for only one year in 1915. At the time Charles priced hardware for Revillon Wholesale, but since emigrating from England in 1906 he also built and sold houses on the side, and the family moved between four different addresses from 1915 to 1925. Their last residence on 97 Street is similar to this one.

Charles Barker Residence - Spring

10834 - 125 Street. Stewart Hill, of the South Side Realty Company, constructed this home around 1912. The Craftsman style house emphasized the use of natural materials and a simplistic design including elements such as the exposed wood frame construction, and timber siding and shingles. The designer emphasized earthiness and openness in contrast to the technological modernity and detailing stressed in the previous industrial era.
Charles and Mabel Barker, the first occupants of this house, moved here for only one year in 1915. At the time Charles priced hardware for Revillon Wholesale, but since emigrating from England in 1906 he also built and sold houses on the side, and the family moved between four different addresses from 1915 to 1925. Their last residence on 97 Street is similar to this one.

Charles Barker Residence - Winter

10834 - 125 Street. Stewart Hill, of the South Side Realty Company, constructed this home around 1912. The Craftsman style house emphasized the use of natural materials and a simplistic design including elements such as the exposed wood frame construction, and timber siding and shingles. The designer emphasized earthiness and openness in contrast to the technological modernity and detailing stressed in the previous industrial era.
Charles and Mabel Barker, the first occupants of this house, moved here for only one year in 1915. At the time Charles priced hardware for Revillon Wholesale, but since emigrating from England in 1906 he also built and sold houses on the side, and the family moved between four different addresses from 1915 to 1925. Their last residence on 97 Street is similar to this one.

Dr. Terwillegar Residence

10727 - 125 Street.
James Carruthers purchased much of Malcolm Groat's homestead in the early 1900s. He subdivided the land, determined that Westmount would be a trimmed down extension of Glenora, the prestigious neighbourhood nearby. The communities attracted businessmen, professionals, and their families in record numbers. Westmount grew to be the greatest concentration of single family dwellings in Edmonton at the time.
Architect John Martland designed this home for Charles W. Coppock in 1912 on one of the first lots to be developed in the new community. The artful simplicity, efficient use of space, extensive use of natural wood, and open eaves exemplify this Craftsman bungalow, although it remains distinct in its inclusion of a hipped rather than gabled roof. Martland later became the city architect, designing the Edmonton Municipal Golf Course, the City Market, and two hangars at the Municipal Airport.
The physician and surgeon, Dr. Norman Terwillegar, his wife Dorothy, and their three children moved to this home in 1920. Terwillegar earned a city-wide reputation for his devotion to his patients at the Royal Alexandra Hospital and in his private practice, based from his home later in his career. In tribute to the good doctor's character and influence in his practice, and during his tenures as president of the Edmonton Academy of Medicine and the Alberta Medical Society, the city named a southwestern community Terwillegar Heights in the 1960s. Dr. Terwillegar died in 1948. This house remained his family's home until 1959.

The Graenon

36 St. George's Crescent.
A popular residential landmark, "The Graenon," a Gaelic word meaning "Sunny Place," was built in 1913 - 1914 for Hannah Margaret (Fairlie) O'Connor and George Bligh O'Connor. It was the first house constructed on St. George's Crescent and the only building ever constructed by Mrs. O'Connor's brother, W. A. Fairlie, who died a few months later during World War I.
"The Graenon" is an exceptional example of domestic architecture of the time. It was designed by a group of Virginia architects under the direction of Edward Bok, the renowned editor of Ladies' Home Journal. Bok was largely responsible for defining a North America-wide stylistic revolution; one that rejected the ornate tastes of the Victorian era for simpler lines. Hence, the exterior of the house is of a Tudor Revival design, while the interior, with its quarter-sawn woodwork, reflects the then-current Arts and Crafts movement.
G. B. O'Connor was a prominent Edmonton barrister who practiced law with Major-General William A. Griesbach before becoming a judge, and later, Chief Justice of Alberta. The O'Connors entertained many of Alberta's early leaders in government and business at "The Graenon." Lieutenant Governor J. J. Bowlen was sworn into office in the front garden in 1950.
Their daughter, Peggy O'Connor Farnell, was born in the home and lived there for over eighty years. Peggy was one of Intrepid's British Security Co-Ordination agents from 1942 to 1945. In 1946, she married Gerald Farnell and they raised three sons. She then worked as a librarian at the University of Alberta for many years in addition to authoring a history of Old Glenora.
Carefully restored to its original character, the residence stands as a milestone in Alberta's early heritage. Of particular interest is a unique ornament - look for the porcelain cat, purchased by the family on a trip to Normandy. It has looked down from the roof since 1928.

The Graenon - The Entrance

36 St. George's Crescent.
A popular residential landmark, "The Graenon," a Gaelic word meaning "Sunny Place," was built in 1913 - 1914 for Hannah Margaret (Fairlie) O'Connor and George Bligh O'Connor. It was the first house constructed on St. George's Crescent and the only building ever constructed by Mrs. O'Connor's brother, W. A. Fairlie, who died a few months later during World War I.
"The Graenon" is an exceptional example of domestic architecture of the time. It was designed by a group of Virginia architects under the direction of Edward Bok, the renowned editor of Ladies' Home Journal. Bok was largely responsible for defining a North America-wide stylistic revolution; one that rejected the ornate tastes of the Victorian era for simpler lines. Hence, the exterior of the house is of a Tudor Revival design, while the interior, with its quarter-sawn woodwork, reflects the then-current Arts and Crafts movement.
G. B. O'Connor was a prominent Edmonton barrister who practiced law with Major-General William A. Griesbach before becoming a judge, and later, Chief Justice of Alberta. The O'Connors entertained many of Alberta's early leaders in government and business at "The Graenon." Lieutenant Governor J. J. Bowlen was sworn into office in the front garden in 1950.
Their daughter, Peggy O'Connor Farnell, was born in the home and lived there for over eighty years. Peggy was one of Intrepid's British Security Co-Ordination agents from 1942 to 1945. In 1946, she married Gerald Farnell and they raised three sons. She then worked as a librarian at the University of Alberta for many years in addition to authoring a history of Old Glenora.
Carefully restored to its original character, the residence stands as a milestone in Alberta's early heritage. Of particular interest is a unique ornament - look for the porcelain cat, purchased by the family on a trip to Normandy. It has looked down from the roof since 1928.

The Graenon - Window Detail

36 St. George's Crescent.
A popular residential landmark, "The Graenon," a Gaelic word meaning "Sunny Place," was built in 1913 - 1914 for Hannah Margaret (Fairlie) O'Connor and George Bligh O'Connor. It was the first house constructed on St. George's Crescent and the only building ever constructed by Mrs. O'Connor's brother, W. A. Fairlie, who died a few months later during World War I.
"The Graenon" is an exceptional example of domestic architecture of the time. It was designed by a group of Virginia architects under the direction of Edward Bok, the renowned editor of Ladies' Home Journal. Bok was largely responsible for defining a North America-wide stylistic revolution; one that rejected the ornate tastes of the Victorian era for simpler lines. Hence, the exterior of the house is of a Tudor Revival design, while the interior, with its quarter-sawn woodwork, reflects the then-current Arts and Crafts movement.
G. B. O'Connor was a prominent Edmonton barrister who practiced law with Major-General William A. Griesbach before becoming a judge, and later, Chief Justice of Alberta. The O'Connors entertained many of Alberta's early leaders in government and business at "The Graenon." Lieutenant Governor J. J. Bowlen was sworn into office in the front garden in 1950.
Their daughter, Peggy O'Connor Farnell, was born in the home and lived there for over eighty years. Peggy was one of Intrepid's British Security Co-Ordination agents from 1942 to 1945. In 1946, she married Gerald Farnell and they raised three sons. She then worked as a librarian at the University of Alberta for many years in addition to authoring a history of Old Glenora.
Carefully restored to its original character, the residence stands as a milestone in Alberta's early heritage. Of particular interest is a unique ornament - look for the porcelain cat, purchased by the family on a trip to Normandy. It has looked down from the roof since 1928.

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