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City of Edmonton. Parks and Recreation Department fonds
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Edmonton Bulletin Building - Site

9797 Jasper Avenue.
The Edmonton Bulletin was the newspaper of record between 1880 and 1903, when the Edmonton Evening Journal began publication. As such it has become one of the most valuable sources of information regarding the early history of the city.
The building in which the Bulletin was published is one of Edmonton's oldest surviving structures. It was built in 1878 on Jasper Avenue east of the present location of the Macdonald Hotel. After several moves around the city it can now be seen at Fort Edmonton Park. This small building was a simple log structure sixteen feet square with a gable roof.
The Bulletin was established by Frank Oliver. He bought the first town lot in Edmonton, and when the Dominion Telegraph reached the area in 1879, allowing "telegraphic" news service, he and Alex Taylor began to publish what he called the world's smallest newspaper the following year.
In addition to bringing the first printing press to Edmonton, Frank Oliver was a member of the North West Territories Council from 1883 to 1896. He was also a Liberal Member of Parliament in the Laurier government after 1896, being re-elected until 1917. From 1905 to 1911 Oliver was Minister of the Interior and Superintendent General of Indian Affairs.

Armstrong Block Front

10125 - 104 Street. This 1912 structure is one of the city's finest remaining examples of commercial style architecture. It is significant because of its association with the early development of Edmonton's warehouse district, an area that accommodated the city's industrial and warehousing commerce. The Armstrong Block is one of a collection of surviving, important warehouse buildings that attest to Edmonton's rapid expansion prior to World War I. The uniqueness of this building is the combination of residential, warehouse and commercial uses, the same functions that it has served since its construction.
The Armstrong Block is also noted for its architecture, a prominent example of Edwardian-era combination of commercial and residential functions. The basement and first floor served wholesale businesses; offices were located on the second floor while the third and fourth floors housed residential units.
The Armstrong was the only building in the warehouse district to be constructed with brick and steel throughout, unusual at the time. Designer David Hardie included such architectural details as projecting brick pilasters, cast stone detailing, arched lintel, pressed metal cornices and an elevated front stone parapet with cast stone "A" insignia.
The building was fully restored in 2004.

Edmonton Incline Railway - Site

10111 Bellamy Hill.
In May 1908 the Incline Railway with its platforms twenty feet by forty feet, started raising and lowering teams and wagons from the level of the steamboat landing to the corner of Macdonald Drive and First Street. After an unsuccessful career of five years, it was dismantled.

Edmonton Incline Railway - Site

10111 Bellamy Hill.
In May 1908 the Incline Railway with its platforms twenty feet by forty feet, started raising and lowering teams and wagons from the level of the steamboat landing to the corner of Macdonald Drive and First Street. After an unsuccessful career of five years, it was dismantled.

Edmonton, Yukon & Pacific Railway Bridge

Trestle Bridge, Mill Creek Ravine.
This wooden trestle bridge, built between 1900 and 1902, is one of the last physical reminders of the existence of the Edmonton, Yukon and Pacific Railway, the "shortest railroad with the longest name".
The E.Y.& P. Railway was the first to bring rail transportation to Edmonton. It was connected to the Canadian Pacific line south of Strathcona, and traveled north along Mill Creek ravine, then across the Low Level Bridge. The first train crossed the bridge into Edmonton on October 20, 1902. By 1907, the line was extended westward where it connected with the new Canadian Northern main line.
The E.Y.& P's passenger service was suspended in 1928. The line was used to haul coal and freight until 1954, when it closed and the tracks were removed.

Edmonton, Yukon & Pacific Railway Bridge

Trestle Bridge, Mill Creek Ravine.
This wooden trestle bridge, built between 1900 and 1902, is one of the last physical reminders of the existence of the Edmonton, Yukon and Pacific Railway, the "shortest railroad with the longest name".
The E.Y.& P. Railway was the first to bring rail transportation to Edmonton. It was connected to the Canadian Pacific line south of Strathcona, and traveled north along Mill Creek ravine, then across the Low Level Bridge. The first train crossed the bridge into Edmonton on October 20, 1902. By 1907, the line was extended westward where it connected with the new Canadian Northern main line.
The E.Y.& P's passenger service was suspended in 1928. The line was used to haul coal and freight until 1954, when it closed and the tracks were removed.

Edmonton, Yukon & Pacific Railway Bridge

Trestle Bridge, Mill Creek Ravine.
This wooden trestle bridge, built between 1900 and 1902, is one of the last physical reminders of the existence of the Edmonton, Yukon and Pacific Railway, the "shortest railroad with the longest name".
The E.Y.& P. Railway was the first to bring rail transportation to Edmonton. It was connected to the Canadian Pacific line south of Strathcona, and traveled north along Mill Creek ravine, then across the Low Level Bridge. The first train crossed the bridge into Edmonton on October 20, 1902. By 1907, the line was extended westward where it connected with the new Canadian Northern main line.
The E.Y.& P's passenger service was suspended in 1928. The line was used to haul coal and freight until 1954, when it closed and the tracks were removed.

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