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Archivistische beschrijving
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Birks Building - Details

900 - 10310 Jasper Avenue. Henry Birks and Sons began their business in Montreal in 1879. They were descendants of a family of silversmiths who had practiced their trade in England since the 15th century. In 1927, Birks bought the successful jewelry store owned by D.A. Kirkland, the "Diamond Prince of Edmonton". The Birks building was designed by Montreal architects Nobbs and Hyde and built by local contractor H.G. MacDonald at a cost of $350,000. Over five thousand people attended the opening of the store in November, 1929. The store featured 200 feet of counters and large display windows.
This building and the one in Montreal are the only original Birks buildings still standing in Canada.
The first two floors of the building are fronted with Tennessee marble. This marble is faced by buff and red Flemish bond brick and trimmed with squares of mosaic tile decoration and patterned metal panels. In keeping with company policy across Canada, Birks reserved most of the office space in the upper floors for medical and dental offices, as a public service. This was the first building in Edmonton which was designed especially for medical offices, incorporating features suggested by doctors.

Y.M.C.A. - Plaque & Cornerstone

10030 - 102A Avenue.
The cornerstone of Edmonton's original YMCA was laid on July 1, 1907 by Mrs. G.H.V. Bulyea, the wife of Alberta's first Lieutenant Governor. The completed building, which was officially opened on February 6, 1908, saw Edmonton's YMCA become another valuable link in the growth of the worldwide Young Men's Christian Association. In 1951, a new YMCA building was erected on an adjacent lot and was expanded in 1961.
Throughout this century the YMCA of Edmonton has consistently served the citizens of Edmonton and district with high quality physical, spiritual and social programs. The "Y" also provides shelter and friendship to the traveling public.

Y.M.C.A. - Young Men's Christian Association

10030 - 102A Avenue.
The cornerstone of Edmonton's original YMCA was laid on July 1, 1907 by Mrs. G.H.V. Bulyea, the wife of Alberta's first Lieutenant Governor. The completed building, which was officially opened on February 6, 1908, saw Edmonton's YMCA become another valuable link in the growth of the worldwide Young Men's Christian Association. In 1951, a new YMCA building was erected on an adjacent lot and was expanded in 1961.
Throughout this century the YMCA of Edmonton has consistently served the citizens of Edmonton and district with high quality physical, spiritual and social programs. The "Y" also provides shelter and friendship to the traveling public.

Westminster Apartments - Corner

9955 - 114 Street.
The Westminster Apartments building was erected during the pre-World War I population and building boom. Constructed in 1912 by Western Canada Properties Ltd. at a cost of $65,000, the building was considered very elegant and counted the Honorable G.H.V. Bulyea among its tenants. Bulyea was Chairman of the Board of Public Works for the provincial government and later became Lieutenant Governor of Alberta.
The building has an historical association with C.A. Brine, building and property manager (1912-1948) for Westminster Apartments Ltd. His fortune allowed his wife, Margaret Hazelwood Gold Brine, to be a generous benefactor of the arts in Edmonton after his death in 1963.
The Westminster Apartments also had a long association with the Spillios family beginning in 1948 when George Spillios, a leader in Edmonton's Greek community and proprietor of the city's well known American Dairy Lunch, purchased the building.

Westminster Apartments - Corner

9955 - 114 Street.
The Westminster Apartments building was erected during the pre-World War I population and building boom. Constructed in 1912 by Western Canada Properties Ltd. at a cost of $65,000, the building was considered very elegant and counted the Honorable G.H.V. Bulyea among its tenants. Bulyea was Chairman of the Board of Public Works for the provincial government and later became Lieutenant Governor of Alberta.
The building has an historical association with C.A. Brine, building and property manager (1912-1948) for Westminster Apartments Ltd. His fortune allowed his wife, Margaret Hazelwood Gold Brine, to be a generous benefactor of the arts in Edmonton after his death in 1963.
The Westminster Apartments also had a long association with the Spillios family beginning in 1948 when George Spillios, a leader in Edmonton's Greek community and proprietor of the city's well known American Dairy Lunch, purchased the building.

Birks Building - Corner Entrance

900 - 10310 Jasper Avenue. Henry Birks and Sons began their business in Montreal in 1879. They were descendants of a family of silversmiths who had practiced their trade in England since the 15th century. In 1927, Birks bought the successful jewelry store owned by D.A. Kirkland, the "Diamond Prince of Edmonton". The Birks building was designed by Montreal architects Nobbs and Hyde and built by local contractor H.G. MacDonald at a cost of $350,000. Over five thousand people attended the opening of the store in November, 1929. The store featured 200 feet of counters and large display windows.
This building and the one in Montreal are the only original Birks buildings still standing in Canada.
The first two floors of the building are fronted with Tennessee marble. This marble is faced by buff and red Flemish bond brick and trimmed with squares of mosaic tile decoration and patterned metal panels. In keeping with company policy across Canada, Birks reserved most of the office space in the upper floors for medical and dental offices, as a public service. This was the first building in Edmonton which was designed especially for medical offices, incorporating features suggested by doctors.

Richard Wallace Residence

10950 - 81 Street.
Battle-weary soldiers returned home from the First World War to face an economic slump and widespread unemployment. Reunited families desperately sought the social stability and comfort that comes from simple family living. Defying the elaborate Victorian styles of the turn of the 20th century, the Craftsman-style homes that emerged in Edmonton's neighbourhoods in the 1910s and 1920s emphasized a longing for hominess and family virtues.
Built in 1923 and named after one of its earliest occupants, the Richard Wallace Residence exemplifies Craftsman qualities with its simple, meaningful design. The interior emphasizes form and function, with space conservatively and creatively fashioned for everyday living.
Richard Wallace, a registrar, sheriff, and clerk of the Supreme Court of Alberta resided here from 1925 until 1943.

Richard Wallace Residence

10950 - 81 Street.
Battle-weary soldiers returned home from the First World War to face an economic slump and widespread unemployment. Reunited families desperately sought the social stability and comfort that comes from simple family living. Defying the elaborate Victorian styles of the turn of the 20th century, the Craftsman-style homes that emerged in Edmonton's neighbourhoods in the 1910s and 1920s emphasized a longing for hominess and family virtues.
Built in 1923 and named after one of its earliest occupants, the Richard Wallace Residence exemplifies Craftsman qualities with its simple, meaningful design. The interior emphasizes form and function, with space conservatively and creatively fashioned for everyday living.
Richard Wallace, a registrar, sheriff, and clerk of the Supreme Court of Alberta resided here from 1925 until 1943.

Victoria Golf Course

12130 River Valley Road.
In 1896 the Edmonton Country Club established, for its own members, a golf course south of Hardisty House, which became their club's headquarters. Hardisty House burned down in 1906, and in 1907 the golf links site was moved slightly to the west and a nine-hole course was created. The Edmonton Country Club operated these links until 1912. In that year the City of Edmonton bought for the Hudson's Bay Company the original golf links, as well as the area which is now Victoria Park.
In May, 1914, Victoria Park was officially opened with the nine-hold Municipal Golf Links being established at the same time. By 1927 the course had expanded to 18 holes, and by 1950 it was again expanded to 27 holes. Victoria has the distinction of being the first Municipal Golf Course in Canada.

Union Bank

10053 Jasper Avenue.
In 1910, when Union Bank announced plans to build on this site few people would have predicted the building would hold a unique place in Edmonton's history. Shortly after opening, the Bank was one of over 10 banks situated on Jasper Avenue between 100th and 101st streets. Today it is the last remaining bank building of the pre-1914 era left on Jasper Avenue.
The Union Bank of Canada opened its first branch in Edmonton in 1900. As the business grew, land was sought on which to construct a suitable building. Buying property from Frank H. Gray for $50,000 in 1909, the Bank hired local architect Roland Lines to design this building.
Designed in the Modern Renaissance style, the local firm of Otto Edinger and Everett Nesbitt were hired as contractors. The base of the building is solid Bedford limestone from Indiana, also found on another Lines building, the Canada Permanent Trust. The red pressed brick, which came from local brickyards added colour to the appearance of the building.
In the original design, the main floor was used as the banking floor. The floor was tiled and finished with columns, entablatures and mahogany woodwork. The building was purchased by the Canadian Realty Company in 1911 for $121,500. In 1928, James Richardson and Sons became the new owner and held on to the building until 1979 when it was purchased by North West Trust.

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