Affichage de 172 résultats

Description archivistique
City of Edmonton. Parks and Recreation Department fonds Houses Anglais
Options de recherche avancée
Aperçu avant impression Affichage :

172 résultats avec objets numériques Afficher les résultats avec des objets numériques

Bard Residence

10544 - 84 Avenue. On May 21, 1912 Delmar Bard obtained building permit number 259 to construct this wonderful neo-Georgian style home. The permit listed Mr. Bard as the contractor and Mr. L. Keith as architect, and the cost was estimated at $6,500. Once completed this 2.5 storey, 427 square metre residence was an outstanding addition to this area.
Delmar Bard came from the American mid-west to Alberta in 1896. He worked at various occupations including Indian agent, provincial roads and bridge inspector and real estate speculator. His ingenuity is reflected in several aspects of the house. One main feature of the home is a built-in central vacuum system. Also, he installed an automobile turntable in front of the garage so he would not have to reverse his vehicle out of the driveway. This has since been removed.
The interior of the home is lavishly furnished with period stained glass windows imported from France. Fine oak woodwork is found throughout the home and the ceilings are trimmed with dentilled moulding. Built-in bookcases, leatherette wallpaper, and some period light fixtures add to the charm of this residence.
Following Delmar's death in 1938, the home was subdivided into suites. These divisions were later removed by Sue Bard, granddaughter of the original owner.

Bard Residence - SW

10544 - 84 Avenue. On May 21, 1912 Delmar Bard obtained building permit number 259 to construct this wonderful neo-Georgian style home. The permit listed Mr. Bard as the contractor and Mr. L. Keith as architect, and the cost was estimated at $6,500. Once completed this 2.5 storey, 427 square metre residence was an outstanding addition to this area.
Delmar Bard came from the American mid-west to Alberta in 1896. He worked at various occupations including Indian agent, provincial roads and bridge inspector and real estate speculator. His ingenuity is reflected in several aspects of the house. One main feature of the home is a built-in central vacuum system. Also, he installed an automobile turntable in front of the garage so he would not have to reverse his vehicle out of the driveway. This has since been removed.
The interior of the home is lavishly furnished with period stained glass windows imported from France. Fine oak woodwork is found throughout the home and the ceilings are trimmed with dentilled moulding. Built-in bookcases, leatherette wallpaper, and some period light fixtures add to the charm of this residence.
Following Delmar's death in 1938, the home was subdivided into suites. These divisions were later removed by Sue Bard, granddaughter of the original owner.

Bard Residence Carriage House

10544 - 84 Avenue. On May 21, 1912 Delmar Bard obtained building permit number 259 to construct this wonderful neo-Georgian style home. The permit listed Mr. Bard as the contractor and Mr. L. Keith as architect, and the cost was estimated at $6,500. Once completed this 2.5 storey, 427 square metre residence was an outstanding addition to this area.
Delmar Bard came from the American mid-west to Alberta in 1896. He worked at various occupations including Indian agent, provincial roads and bridge inspector and real estate speculator. His ingenuity is reflected in several aspects of the house. One main feature of the home is a built-in central vacuum system. Also, he installed an automobile turntable in front of the garage so he would not have to reverse his vehicle out of the driveway. This has since been removed.
The interior of the home is lavishly furnished with period stained glass windows imported from France. Fine oak woodwork is found throughout the home and the ceilings are trimmed with dentilled moulding. Built-in bookcases, leatherette wallpaper, and some period light fixtures add to the charm of this residence.
Following Delmar's death in 1938, the home was subdivided into suites. These divisions were later removed by Sue Bard, granddaughter of the original owner.

Bard Residence & Carriage House

10544 - 84 Avenue. On May 21, 1912 Delmar Bard obtained building permit number 259 to construct this wonderful neo-Georgian style home. The permit listed Mr. Bard as the contractor and Mr. L. Keith as architect, and the cost was estimated at $6,500. Once completed this 2.5 storey, 427 square metre residence was an outstanding addition to this area.
Delmar Bard came from the American mid-west to Alberta in 1896. He worked at various occupations including Indian agent, provincial roads and bridge inspector and real estate speculator. His ingenuity is reflected in several aspects of the house. One main feature of the home is a built-in central vacuum system. Also, he installed an automobile turntable in front of the garage so he would not have to reverse his vehicle out of the driveway. This has since been removed.
The interior of the home is lavishly furnished with period stained glass windows imported from France. Fine oak woodwork is found throughout the home and the ceilings are trimmed with dentilled moulding. Built-in bookcases, leatherette wallpaper, and some period light fixtures add to the charm of this residence.
Following Delmar's death in 1938, the home was subdivided into suites. These divisions were later removed by Sue Bard, granddaughter of the original owner.

Bard Residence - Front

10544 - 84 Avenue. On May 21, 1912 Delmar Bard obtained building permit number 259 to construct this wonderful neo-Georgian style home. The permit listed Mr. Bard as the contractor and Mr. L. Keith as architect, and the cost was estimated at $6,500. Once completed this 2.5 storey, 427 square metre residence was an outstanding addition to this area.
Delmar Bard came from the American mid-west to Alberta in 1896. He worked at various occupations including Indian agent, provincial roads and bridge inspector and real estate speculator. His ingenuity is reflected in several aspects of the house. One main feature of the home is a built-in central vacuum system. Also, he installed an automobile turntable in front of the garage so he would not have to reverse his vehicle out of the driveway. This has since been removed.
The interior of the home is lavishly furnished with period stained glass windows imported from France. Fine oak woodwork is found throughout the home and the ceilings are trimmed with dentilled moulding. Built-in bookcases, leatherette wallpaper, and some period light fixtures add to the charm of this residence.
Following Delmar's death in 1938, the home was subdivided into suites. These divisions were later removed by Sue Bard, granddaughter of the original owner.

Sheriff Robertson House

8120 Jasper Avenue.
Walter Scott Robertson was born in St. John, New Brunswick in 1841. He settled in Edmonton in 1882 and was soon appointed the first Sheriff of the Edmonton district. Robertson served in that capacity until retiring, shortly before his death, in 1915.
Sheriff Robertson built this house in 1912 as his retirement home. It was designed by Alfred M. Calderon, an Edmonton architect who also designed the LeMarchand Mansion. Calderon was influenced by acclaimed American architect Frank Lloyd Wright, whose "Prairie - Style" house is reflected here.
The house features an octagonal cupola, located over a two storey rotunda containing a fieldstone fireplace. The "porte chochere" or covered drive-through at the front was built for horse drawn carriages.

Sheriff Robertson House - SW

8120 Jasper Avenue.
Walter Scott Robertson was born in St. John, New Brunswick in 1841. He settled in Edmonton in 1882 and was soon appointed the first Sheriff of the Edmonton district. Robertson served in that capacity until retiring, shortly before his death, in 1915.
Sheriff Robertson built this house in 1912 as his retirement home. It was designed by Alfred M. Calderon, an Edmonton architect who also designed the LeMarchand Mansion. Calderon was influenced by acclaimed American architect Frank Lloyd Wright, whose "Prairie - Style" house is reflected here.
The house features an octagonal cupola, located over a two storey rotunda containing a fieldstone fireplace. The "porte chochere" or covered drive-through at the front was built for horse drawn carriages.

Sheriff Robertson House - SW

8120 Jasper Avenue.
Walter Scott Robertson was born in St. John, New Brunswick in 1841. He settled in Edmonton in 1882 and was soon appointed the first Sheriff of the Edmonton district. Robertson served in that capacity until retiring, shortly before his death, in 1915.
Sheriff Robertson built this house in 1912 as his retirement home. It was designed by Alfred M. Calderon, an Edmonton architect who also designed the LeMarchand Mansion. Calderon was influenced by acclaimed American architect Frank Lloyd Wright, whose "Prairie - Style" house is reflected here.
The house features an octagonal cupola, located over a two storey rotunda containing a fieldstone fireplace. The "porte chochere" or covered drive-through at the front was built for horse drawn carriages.

Sheriff Robertson House - SE

8120 Jasper Avenue.
Walter Scott Robertson was born in St. John, New Brunswick in 1841. He settled in Edmonton in 1882 and was soon appointed the first Sheriff of the Edmonton district. Robertson served in that capacity until retiring, shortly before his death, in 1915.
Sheriff Robertson built this house in 1912 as his retirement home. It was designed by Alfred M. Calderon, an Edmonton architect who also designed the LeMarchand Mansion. Calderon was influenced by acclaimed American architect Frank Lloyd Wright, whose "Prairie - Style" house is reflected here.
The house features an octagonal cupola, located over a two storey rotunda containing a fieldstone fireplace. The "porte chochere" or covered drive-through at the front was built for horse drawn carriages.

Charles Barker Residence

10834 - 125 Street. Stewart Hill, of the South Side Realty Company, constructed this home around 1912. The Craftsman style house emphasized the use of natural materials and a simplistic design including elements such as the exposed wood frame construction, and timber siding and shingles. The designer emphasized earthiness and openness in contrast to the technological modernity and detailing stressed in the previous industrial era.
Charles and Mabel Barker, the first occupants of this house, moved here for only one year in 1915. At the time Charles priced hardware for Revillon Wholesale, but since emigrating from England in 1906 he also built and sold houses on the side, and the family moved between four different addresses from 1915 to 1925. Their last residence on 97 Street is similar to this one.

Résultats 41 à 50 sur 172