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Archivistische beschrijving
Historic buildings
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Boardwalk Building - E

10310 - 102 Avenue. In 1910 Ross Brothers retail and wholesale dealers built what was considered one of the most modern hardware warehouses in Western Canada. The Boardwalk was designed by E.C. Hopkins, and built by Pheasey and Baston. From this time on this area became a focal point in Edmonton's commercial and warehouse district during its first major boom preceding the First World War.
From 1910 to 1912 Ross Bros. operated this building. James Ross had arrived in Edmonton in 1878 and was a town alderman on four occasions. From 1912 until 1921 Marshall Wells Hardware owned the building, and in the fifty years between 1921 and 1971 Ashdowne Hardware, whose painted logo was for many years a feature of this corner, carried on the business. In 1928 and 1940 additions were made.
N.A. Properties, the current owners, completed a major restoration of the building. It is considered as the largest and best example of Second Renaissance Revival style in Edmonton.

Boardwalk Building

10310 - 102 Avenue. In 1910 Ross Brothers retail and wholesale dealers built what was considered one of the most modern hardware warehouses in Western Canada. The Boardwalk was designed by E.C. Hopkins, and built by Pheasey and Baston. From this time on this area became a focal point in Edmonton's commercial and warehouse district during its first major boom preceding the First World War.
From 1910 to 1912 Ross Bros. operated this building. James Ross had arrived in Edmonton in 1878 and was a town alderman on four occasions. From 1912 until 1921 Marshall Wells Hardware owned the building, and in the fifty years between 1921 and 1971 Ashdowne Hardware, whose painted logo was for many years a feature of this corner, carried on the business. In 1928 and 1940 additions were made.
N.A. Properties, the current owners, completed a major restoration of the building. It is considered as the largest and best example of Second Renaissance Revival style in Edmonton.

William Blakey Residence

13526 - 101 Avenue. William Blakey was one of Edmonton's most influential architects. He arrived in Edmonton in 1907 following his brother and fellow architect, Richard to the rapidly growing city. While Richard rose to become Provincial Architect from 1912 to 1924, William worked mostly in private practice.
He designed this house for his family in 1946 to reflect his advocacy of slab grade construction and other innovations in construction methods and materials. It features a symmetrical plan with a flat roof, large overhanging eaves, corner windows, and unornamented wall surfaces. These are all characteristic of the International style.

William Blakey Residence

13526 - 101 Avenue. William Blakey was one of Edmonton's most influential architects. He arrived in Edmonton in 1907 following his brother and fellow architect, Richard to the rapidly growing city. While Richard rose to become Provincial Architect from 1912 to 1924, William worked mostly in private practice.
He designed this house for his family in 1946 to reflect his advocacy of slab grade construction and other innovations in construction methods and materials. It features a symmetrical plan with a flat roof, large overhanging eaves, corner windows, and unornamented wall surfaces. These are all characteristic of the International style.

Birks Building

900 - 10310 Jasper Avenue. Henry Birks and Sons began their business in Montreal in 1879. They were descendants of a family of silversmiths who had practiced their trade in England since the 15th century. In 1927, Birks bought the successful jewelry store owned by D.A. Kirkland, the "Diamond Prince of Edmonton". The Birks building was designed by Montreal architects Nobbs and Hyde and built by local contractor H.G. MacDonald at a cost of $350,000. Over five thousand people attended the opening of the store in November, 1929. The store featured 200 feet of counters and large display windows.
This building and the one in Montreal are the only original Birks buildings still standing in Canada.
The first two floors of the building are fronted with Tennessee marble. This marble is faced by buff and red Flemish bond brick and trimmed with squares of mosaic tile decoration and patterned metal panels. In keeping with company policy across Canada, Birks reserved most of the office space in the upper floors for medical and dental offices, as a public service. This was the first building in Edmonton which was designed especially for medical offices, incorporating features suggested by doctors.

Birks Building - Window Detail

900 - 10310 Jasper Avenue. Henry Birks and Sons began their business in Montreal in 1879. They were descendants of a family of silversmiths who had practiced their trade in England since the 15th century. In 1927, Birks bought the successful jewelry store owned by D.A. Kirkland, the "Diamond Prince of Edmonton". The Birks building was designed by Montreal architects Nobbs and Hyde and built by local contractor H.G. MacDonald at a cost of $350,000. Over five thousand people attended the opening of the store in November, 1929. The store featured 200 feet of counters and large display windows.
This building and the one in Montreal are the only original Birks buildings still standing in Canada.
The first two floors of the building are fronted with Tennessee marble. This marble is faced by buff and red Flemish bond brick and trimmed with squares of mosaic tile decoration and patterned metal panels. In keeping with company policy across Canada, Birks reserved most of the office space in the upper floors for medical and dental offices, as a public service. This was the first building in Edmonton which was designed especially for medical offices, incorporating features suggested by doctors.

Birks Building - Panel Detail

900 - 10310 Jasper Avenue. Henry Birks and Sons began their business in Montreal in 1879. They were descendants of a family of silversmiths who had practiced their trade in England since the 15th century. In 1927, Birks bought the successful jewelry store owned by D.A. Kirkland, the "Diamond Prince of Edmonton". The Birks building was designed by Montreal architects Nobbs and Hyde and built by local contractor H.G. MacDonald at a cost of $350,000. Over five thousand people attended the opening of the store in November, 1929. The store featured 200 feet of counters and large display windows.
This building and the one in Montreal are the only original Birks buildings still standing in Canada.
The first two floors of the building are fronted with Tennessee marble. This marble is faced by buff and red Flemish bond brick and trimmed with squares of mosaic tile decoration and patterned metal panels. In keeping with company policy across Canada, Birks reserved most of the office space in the upper floors for medical and dental offices, as a public service. This was the first building in Edmonton which was designed especially for medical offices, incorporating features suggested by doctors.

Birks Building - Metal Detail

900 - 10310 Jasper Avenue. Henry Birks and Sons began their business in Montreal in 1879. They were descendants of a family of silversmiths who had practiced their trade in England since the 15th century. In 1927, Birks bought the successful jewelry store owned by D.A. Kirkland, the "Diamond Prince of Edmonton". The Birks building was designed by Montreal architects Nobbs and Hyde and built by local contractor H.G. MacDonald at a cost of $350,000. Over five thousand people attended the opening of the store in November, 1929. The store featured 200 feet of counters and large display windows.
This building and the one in Montreal are the only original Birks buildings still standing in Canada.
The first two floors of the building are fronted with Tennessee marble. This marble is faced by buff and red Flemish bond brick and trimmed with squares of mosaic tile decoration and patterned metal panels. In keeping with company policy across Canada, Birks reserved most of the office space in the upper floors for medical and dental offices, as a public service. This was the first building in Edmonton which was designed especially for medical offices, incorporating features suggested by doctors.

Birks Building - Details

900 - 10310 Jasper Avenue. Henry Birks and Sons began their business in Montreal in 1879. They were descendants of a family of silversmiths who had practiced their trade in England since the 15th century. In 1927, Birks bought the successful jewelry store owned by D.A. Kirkland, the "Diamond Prince of Edmonton". The Birks building was designed by Montreal architects Nobbs and Hyde and built by local contractor H.G. MacDonald at a cost of $350,000. Over five thousand people attended the opening of the store in November, 1929. The store featured 200 feet of counters and large display windows.
This building and the one in Montreal are the only original Birks buildings still standing in Canada.
The first two floors of the building are fronted with Tennessee marble. This marble is faced by buff and red Flemish bond brick and trimmed with squares of mosaic tile decoration and patterned metal panels. In keeping with company policy across Canada, Birks reserved most of the office space in the upper floors for medical and dental offices, as a public service. This was the first building in Edmonton which was designed especially for medical offices, incorporating features suggested by doctors.

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