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City of Edmonton. Parks and Recreation Department fonds Houses Anglais
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Margaret Martin Residence - SW

8324 - 106 Street.
Margaret Martin, a widow, owned a 320-acre farm on this site at the turn of the 20th century. In 1899 Margaret and her husband, David, left their North Dakota home to settle in the Canadian North West. David set off with livestock and farm machinery in April to secure the land, and Margaret followed in July with their eleven children. Sadly, one small daughter died of pneumonia shortly after they arrived. Eighteen months later, David died of the same illness. The family buried both loved ones on their farm, at what is now Mount Pleasant Cemetery.
Margaret commissioned the architectural firm of Magoon, Hopkins and James to design this Foursquare, Prairie-style home in 1907. The firm later became Magoon and MacDonald Associates that built the Metals Building, Tegler Building, McDougall United Church, Salvation Army Citadel, St. Stephen's College, and other Edmonton landmarks.
The Martin family moved into what was then 18 Second Street West, Strathcona, the only house on the west side of the street until 1910. The remaining area of Martin Estates, the name given to the newly subdivided farmland, eventually became the communities of Pleasantview and Parkallen.
Margaret died in 1940, leaving the home in her daughter Edith’s care. The Martin children created their own legacy in Edmonton. Grace Martin McEachern became a well known school teacher. Helen Martin married Cecil Rutherford, the only son of Alberta's first premier, A.C. Rutherford. David Quincy Martin worked for thirty years with the Alberta Liquor Control Board after marrying Lova Shaw, daughter of H.V. Shaw, proprietor of Edmonton Cigar Factory.

Margaret Martin Residence

8324 - 106 Street.
Margaret Martin, a widow, owned a 320-acre farm on this site at the turn of the 20th century. In 1899 Margaret and her husband, David, left their North Dakota home to settle in the Canadian North West. David set off with livestock and farm machinery in April to secure the land, and Margaret followed in July with their eleven children. Sadly, one small daughter died of pneumonia shortly after they arrived. Eighteen months later, David died of the same illness. The family buried both loved ones on their farm, at what is now Mount Pleasant Cemetery.
Margaret commissioned the architectural firm of Magoon, Hopkins and James to design this Foursquare, Prairie-style home in 1907. The firm later became Magoon and MacDonald Associates that built the Metals Building, Tegler Building, McDougall United Church, Salvation Army Citadel, St. Stephen's College, and other Edmonton landmarks.
The Martin family moved into what was then 18 Second Street West, Strathcona, the only house on the west side of the street until 1910. The remaining area of Martin Estates, the name given to the newly subdivided farmland, eventually became the communities of Pleasantview and Parkallen.
Margaret died in 1940, leaving the home in her daughter Edith’s care. The Martin children created their own legacy in Edmonton. Grace Martin McEachern became a well known school teacher. Helen Martin married Cecil Rutherford, the only son of Alberta's first premier, A.C. Rutherford. David Quincy Martin worked for thirty years with the Alberta Liquor Control Board after marrying Lova Shaw, daughter of H.V. Shaw, proprietor of Edmonton Cigar Factory.

McLean House

10454 - 84 Avenue.
Arthur McLean, a pioneer businessman, came to what was South Edmonton from Manitoba in 1892. Mr. McLean was elected to town council in 1901 and was active in community affairs. He sat on the local school board and helped establish Holy Trinity Anglican Church while owning and operating a hardware business on Whyte Avenue until he passed away in 1916.
In 1896 the Bisset brothers constructed this best remaining example of a Gothic revival or Carpenter Gothic style residence, typical in type and size to those built by new and prominent members of Strathcona. Mrs. McLean continued to live in the house until her death in 1951. Family members owned the property until 1976 when it was purchased by the Old Strathcona Foundation. Presently, this residence is privately owned and remains the longest serving modern residence in Edmonton.

Sarah McLellan Residence

11135 - 84 Avenue.
This home, constructed by Tom Leake, was built in 1913 and then valued at $4,500. It is one of the original, unaltered structures still remaining in the neighbourhood. Sarah McLellan immigrated from Scotland in 1906 and purchased the lot from Laurent Garneau in 1907. He was the Metis farmer who owned most of the land on which the University of Alberta and the Garneau community are now located.
This residence is a larger version of the four square architectural style home with Arts and Crafts characteristics.
From 1916 to 1922, the house was used as a nurses' residence for the nurses working with WWI casualties at the military hospital that was located where the University of Alberta Hospital stands today.

Sarah McLellan Residence

11135 - 84 Avenue.
This home, constructed by Tom Leake, was built in 1913 and then valued at $4,500. It is one of the original, unaltered structures still remaining in the neighbourhood. Sarah McLellan immigrated from Scotland in 1906 and purchased the lot from Laurent Garneau in 1907. He was the Metis farmer who owned most of the land on which the University of Alberta and the Garneau community are now located.
This residence is a larger version of the four square architectural style home with Arts and Crafts characteristics.
From 1916 to 1922, the house was used as a nurses' residence for the nurses working with WWI casualties at the military hospital that was located where the University of Alberta Hospital stands today.

Molstad House

9633 - 95 Avenue.
This two storey brick and wood house originally rested on five acres of land and was surrounded by a circular driveway, fountains and trees. Built in 1912 for Edmonton realtor Edward H. Molstad and wife Addie, the home became well known in the community for its annual Christmas parties for local children.
In its day it was considered ultra-modern and boasted oak panelling, hardwood floors, sculptured ceilings, brass chandeliers and an unusual fireplace in the dining room. On the second floor there were five bedrooms and two bathrooms. Living quarters for the cook, maid and other help for the Molstad's farm was in the upper portion of the house.
In 1931 the residence was converted into an apartment building, but the Molstad's continued to live in part of the house.
Its importance has been acknowledged by the City of Edmonton, becoming the first residential building to receive historical designation.

Molstad House

9633 - 95 Avenue.
This two storey brick and wood house originally rested on five acres of land and was surrounded by a circular driveway, fountains and trees. Built in 1912 for Edmonton realtor Edward H. Molstad and wife Addie, the home became well known in the community for its annual Christmas parties for local children.
In its day it was considered ultra-modern and boasted oak panelling, hardwood floors, sculptured ceilings, brass chandeliers and an unusual fireplace in the dining room. On the second floor there were five bedrooms and two bathrooms. Living quarters for the cook, maid and other help for the Molstad's farm was in the upper portion of the house.
In 1931 the residence was converted into an apartment building, but the Molstad's continued to live in part of the house.
Its importance has been acknowledged by the City of Edmonton, becoming the first residential building to receive historical designation.

Molstad House

9633 - 95 Avenue.
This two storey brick and wood house originally rested on five acres of land and was surrounded by a circular driveway, fountains and trees. Built in 1912 for Edmonton realtor Edward H. Molstad and wife Addie, the home became well known in the community for its annual Christmas parties for local children.
In its day it was considered ultra-modern and boasted oak panelling, hardwood floors, sculptured ceilings, brass chandeliers and an unusual fireplace in the dining room. On the second floor there were five bedrooms and two bathrooms. Living quarters for the cook, maid and other help for the Molstad's farm was in the upper portion of the house.
In 1931 the residence was converted into an apartment building, but the Molstad's continued to live in part of the house.
Its importance has been acknowledged by the City of Edmonton, becoming the first residential building to receive historical designation.

Emily Murphy House

11011 - 88 Avenue.
Emily Murphy lived in this house from 1919 until her death in 1933. The house, built in 1912, is of the typical frame construction of the first quarter of the century.
Emily Murphy arrived in Edmonton in 1907 and soon became active in her community. In 1916, Emily Murphy became the first woman magistrate in the British Empire, a position she held until 1931.
She is best remembered as one of the five Alberta women who won the Persons Case in 1929. After presenting their case to the Privy Council it was declared that Canadian women were "persons" under the meaning of the British North America Act.
She was awarded the Order of Saint John of Jerusalem in 1915 and was active in many women's organizations including the Women's Canadian Club, Federated Women's Institutes of Canada and the National Council of Women. As well, Emily Murphy was an author with many books and articles to her credit.

Bard Residence & Carriage House

10544 - 84 Avenue. On May 21, 1912 Delmar Bard obtained building permit number 259 to construct this wonderful neo-Georgian style home. The permit listed Mr. Bard as the contractor and Mr. L. Keith as architect, and the cost was estimated at $6,500. Once completed this 2.5 storey, 427 square metre residence was an outstanding addition to this area.
Delmar Bard came from the American mid-west to Alberta in 1896. He worked at various occupations including Indian agent, provincial roads and bridge inspector and real estate speculator. His ingenuity is reflected in several aspects of the house. One main feature of the home is a built-in central vacuum system. Also, he installed an automobile turntable in front of the garage so he would not have to reverse his vehicle out of the driveway. This has since been removed.
The interior of the home is lavishly furnished with period stained glass windows imported from France. Fine oak woodwork is found throughout the home and the ceilings are trimmed with dentilled moulding. Built-in bookcases, leatherette wallpaper, and some period light fixtures add to the charm of this residence.
Following Delmar's death in 1938, the home was subdivided into suites. These divisions were later removed by Sue Bard, granddaughter of the original owner.

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