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Archivistische beschrijving
Historic buildings
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Charles J. Carter Residence - Front

10603 - 103 Street
Charles J. Carter constructed this home in 1907. Similar to single-family dwellings built by other Edmonton entrepreneurs at the time, his house features a wooden frame, lapped wood siding, and a front veranda with turned porch columns.
The City relocated the Carter residence and stable from their original location at 54 Heiminck Street (10002-107 Avenue) to this spot in 1995 as a tribute to a time when horses, pigs, and chickens were more common in Edmonton yards than Fords, Toyotas, and Jeeps.
Carter worked as a contractor, blacksmith, and packer for the furniture company Blowey-Henry, and although his name graces this home, he only lived here for a short time. Others enjoyed the home for many long years. Residents included the baker, Charles W. Campbell; a retired couple, James and Mary Gauld; the men of the Men's Co-operative Residence here in the 1950s; and the longest-staying occupant, Martha Pehl, an employee of McGavin's bakery before her retirement.

Charles J. Carter Residence - Back

10603 - 103 Street
Charles J. Carter constructed this home in 1907. Similar to single-family dwellings built by other Edmonton entrepreneurs at the time, his house features a wooden frame, lapped wood siding, and a front veranda with turned porch columns.
Take a peek around back. Carter's property also includes a gable-roofed horse stable, complete with hayloft.
Many Edmonton homes built before the First World War had similar outbuildings, but this is perhaps the only one of its kind left in the city.

Charles J. Carter Residence

10603 - 103 Street
Charles J. Carter constructed this home in 1907. Similar to single-family dwellings built by other Edmonton entrepreneurs at the time, his house features a wooden frame, lapped wood siding, and a front veranda with turned porch columns.
The City relocated the Carter residence and stable from their original location at 54 Heiminck Street (10002-107 Avenue) to this spot in 1995 as a tribute to a time when horses, pigs, and chickens were more common in Edmonton yards than Fords, Toyotas, and Jeeps.
Carter worked as a contractor, blacksmith, and packer for the furniture company Blowey-Henry, and although his name graces this home, he only lived here for a short time. Others enjoyed the home for many long years. Residents included the baker, Charles W. Campbell; a retired couple, James and Mary Gauld; the men of the Men's Co-operative Residence here in the 1950s; and the longest-staying occupant, Martha Pehl, an employee of McGavin's bakery before her retirement.

Canadian Pacific Strathcona Station - NE

8101 - 103 Street.
In 1891 the first train arrived in South Edmonton. The original station was a wooden structure built just south of this location. A replica of that station has been recreated by the Junior League of Edmonton and is used as the C & E Railway Museum.
Construction began on this building in 1907 and it was opened on January 21, 1908, at a cost of $30,000. Its architectural style combines a mixture of Scottish and French Chateau schools of design. The second storey remained undeveloped until 1914 when it was then used as a storage facility and living quarters for train crews. Although Strathcona amalgamated with Edmonton in 1912, it was not until 1932 that the name of the station was changed from Strathcona to South Edmonton Station.
The last passenger train left this terminal in 1985 and in 1992 the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada designated the building a heritage railway station.
Strathcona Station remains one of only four stations of its design in Alberta, all of which were built from 1905 to 1910.

Canadian Pacific Strathcona Station - East

8101 - 103 Street.
In 1891 the first train arrived in South Edmonton. The original station was a wooden structure built just south of this location. A replica of that station has been recreated by the Junior League of Edmonton and is used as the C & E Railway Museum.
Construction began on this building in 1907 and it was opened on January 21, 1908, at a cost of $30,000. Its architectural style combines a mixture of Scottish and French Chateau schools of design. The second storey remained undeveloped until 1914 when it was then used as a storage facility and living quarters for train crews. Although Strathcona amalgamated with Edmonton in 1912, it was not until 1932 that the name of the station was changed from Strathcona to South Edmonton Station.
The last passenger train left this terminal in 1985 and in 1992 the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada designated the building a heritage railway station.
Strathcona Station remains one of only four stations of its design in Alberta, all of which were built from 1905 to 1910.

Canadian Bank of Commerce - Detail

10102 Jasper Avenue.
An Edmonton Bulletin report in 1929 described the bank as, "...one of the most highly furnished and finished banking rooms in Western Canada." The east and south faces of the building are Manitoba Tyndal stone, used extensively throughout the city as a finish for financial and government buildings. There are three balconettes on the south face and four more on the east side with metal balustrades carrying the Bank's monogram. Double Tuscan columns flank the front entrance along with the Bank's insignia.
Inside, the bank featured a high dentilled plaster ceiling, polished walnut counters and Ionic columns and pilasters. There was a modest level of bronze and marble detailing which is evidenced today in the stair serving the second to sixth floors. This building is an early example of reinforced concrete construction and utilized a thermostatically controlled heating system, unique for its time. The top four storeys of the five storey building were rented to a variety of professionals and retailers over the years.

Canadian Bank of Commerce

10102 Jasper Avenue.
This late Renaissance Revival commercial building was designed by V. D. Horsburgh, and built under the direction of Herbert Magoon and George H. Macdonald at a cost of $500,000. The building opened as the Canadian Bank of Commerce on July 2, 1929. In 1962 the Canadian Bank of Commerce merged with the Imperial Bank of Canada and the building became known as the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce.
An addition in 1964 and further modernization in 1984 resulted in extensive changes to the exterior of the north portion of the bank and its interior. In 1998-99 the CIBC undertook a major renovation and upgrading program to refurbish the banking hall and re-establish this as a prominent building in downtown Edmonton.

Alberta College

In the 1860s the Reverend George MacDougall bequeathed his homestead on this site to the Methodist Church for educational and missionary purposes. Alberta College was founded by members of the MacDougall Church Board in 1903. The college offered a curriculum of music, commercial, secondary school and university transfer subjects, initially in affiliation with McGill University.
After a year in temporary premises, the college occupied its first permanent building on this site in 1904. In 1926 the Theological Department was amalgamated into St. Stephen's College on the University of Alberta campus. That same year the college expanded into a handsome gothic style building faced with tapestry brick and Indiana limestone. The building was demolished in 1961, and its successor was in turn replaced by the current structure which opened in 1993.

Canadian Consolidated Rubber Co. Building - Detail

10249 - 104 Street.
The windows on the east facade, where minimal setback was provided at the lane, offer increased fire and security protection owing to their metal sash construction and pivoting, wired glass infill panels. The west facing windows remain wooden and of double-hung sash construction.
The building's design creates a more vertical emphasis than its neighbours, with its two storey entrance and centre bay of windows located at the stair landing rather than on each floor, but the overall Commercial style facade characterizes the warehouse district.

Canadian Consolidated Rubber Co. Building

10249 - 104 Street.
January 16, 1913. The temperature plunges well below 20C. With inadequate water pressure to run their equipment, firefighters watch hopelessly as the inferno engulfs two buildings on this location and kills three people. This is one of the worst fires the city has seen, and it sparks rapid improvements in local fire safety practices.
William Allen, head of a Winnipeg investment consortium, acquired the charred site and built a replacement warehouse for the previous tenant, the Canadian Consolidated Rubber Company, in only two months. The designer and builder, the Canadian Stewart Company of Toronto, had just finished constructing the Macdonald Hotel when it installed the latest in fire safety technology in the new warehouse. Concrete encases the boiler room; metal sheaths the new fire doors; and the interior stairs feature steel risers, treads, and stringers. The windows on the east facade, where minimal setback was provided at the lane, offer increased fire and security protection owing to their metal sash construction and pivoting, wired glass infill panels. The west facing windows remain wooden and of double-hung sash construction.
The building's design creates a more vertical emphasis than its neighbours, with its two storey entrance and centre bay of windows located at the stair landing rather than on each floor, but the overall Commercial style facade characterizes the warehouse district.
This building served the rubber company until 1935, and is one of the longest-standing warehouses in the downtown core. Few significant exterior changes have been made by subsequent owners which have included the Kaufman Rubber Company, Cobogo Holdings Ltd., and the Army and Navy Department Store Holdings Ltd.

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