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City of Edmonton. Parks and Recreation Department fonds Houses Anglais
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George Durrand Residence - SE

10417 Saskatchewan Drive.
The Durrand Residence is valued for its association with the Durrand family, who were representative of the type of entrepreneurial and professional families that began to populate the city of Strathcona early in the twentieth century. The house was later home to Harold Gould Macdonald, a noted Edmontonian and founder of the H.G. Macdonald Company of contractors that has grown into the well-recognized firm of Christensen and Macdonald. He lived in the house until 1923.

Richard Foote Residence

9704 - 106 Street
Richard Foote was in Edmonton by the time a building boom began after 1903. The young bricklayer went to work on the Alberta Hotel on Jasper Avenue. Later, as a contractor, he led the construction of Edmonton's Civic Block, St. Mary's High School, Athabasca Hall at the University of Alberta, as well as the psychiatric hospital at Ponoka. Married twice with seven children, Foote served as an alderman from 1934 to 1936, and then worked as an assistant city building inspector, retiring four years before his death in 1948.
Foote built this Foursquare residence in 1907, and moved into it one year later. The overhanging eaves, open veranda, square columns, and symmetrical design typify the Prairie-style architecture of the era. Unique to Foote's design are the dormers and widow's walk on top of the pressed sheet metal bell cast roof that flares out at the bottom, and the ground floor level brick banding, or rustication. Note the multiple paned bay windows: a distinctive front-facing one, and on the south side, one with a subtle curve.

Richard Foote Residence - Entrance

9704 - 106 Street
Richard Foote was in Edmonton by the time a building boom began after 1903. The young bricklayer went to work on the Alberta Hotel on Jasper Avenue. Later, as a contractor, he led the construction of Edmonton's Civic Block, St. Mary's High School, Athabasca Hall at the University of Alberta, as well as the psychiatric hospital at Ponoka. Married twice with seven children, Foote served as an alderman from 1934 to 1936, and then worked as an assistant city building inspector, retiring four years before his death in 1948.
Foote built this Foursquare residence in 1907, and moved into it one year later. The overhanging eaves, open veranda, square columns, and symmetrical design typify the Prairie-style architecture of the era. Unique to Foote's design are the dormers and widow's walk on top of the pressed sheet metal bell cast roof that flares out at the bottom, and the ground floor level brick banding, or rustication. Note the multiple paned bay windows: a distinctive front-facing one, and on the south side, one with a subtle curve.

Richard Foote Residence - SE

9704 - 106 Street
Richard Foote was in Edmonton by the time a building boom began after 1903. The young bricklayer went to work on the Alberta Hotel on Jasper Avenue. Later, as a contractor, he led the construction of Edmonton's Civic Block, St. Mary's High School, Athabasca Hall at the University of Alberta, as well as the psychiatric hospital at Ponoka. Married twice with seven children, Foote served as an alderman from 1934 to 1936, and then worked as an assistant city building inspector, retiring four years before his death in 1948.
Foote built this Foursquare residence in 1907, and moved into it one year later. The overhanging eaves, open veranda, square columns, and symmetrical design typify the Prairie-style architecture of the era. Unique to Foote's design are the dormers and widow's walk on top of the pressed sheet metal bell cast roof that flares out at the bottom, and the ground floor level brick banding, or rustication. Note the multiple paned bay windows: a distinctive front-facing one, and on the south side, one with a subtle curve.

Richard Foote Residence - SW

9704 - 106 Street
Richard Foote was in Edmonton by the time a building boom began after 1903. The young bricklayer went to work on the Alberta Hotel on Jasper Avenue. Later, as a contractor, he led the construction of Edmonton's Civic Block, St. Mary's High School, Athabasca Hall at the University of Alberta, as well as the psychiatric hospital at Ponoka. Married twice with seven children, Foote served as an alderman from 1934 to 1936, and then worked as an assistant city building inspector, retiring four years before his death in 1948.
Foote built this Foursquare residence in 1907, and moved into it one year later. The overhanging eaves, open veranda, square columns, and symmetrical design typify the Prairie-style architecture of the era. Unique to Foote's design are the dormers and widow's walk on top of the pressed sheet metal bell cast roof that flares out at the bottom, and the ground floor level brick banding, or rustication. Note the multiple paned bay windows: a distinctive front-facing one, and on the south side, one with a subtle curve.

Richard Foote Residence

9704 - 106 Street
Richard Foote was in Edmonton by the time a building boom began after 1903. The young bricklayer went to work on the Alberta Hotel on Jasper Avenue. Later, as a contractor, he led the construction of Edmonton's Civic Block, St. Mary's High School, Athabasca Hall at the University of Alberta, as well as the psychiatric hospital at Ponoka. Married twice with seven children, Foote served as an alderman from 1934 to 1936, and then worked as an assistant city building inspector, retiring four years before his death in 1948.
Foote built this Foursquare residence in 1907, and moved into it one year later. The overhanging eaves, open veranda, square columns, and symmetrical design typify the Prairie-style architecture of the era. Unique to Foote's design are the dormers and widow's walk on top of the pressed sheet metal bell cast roof that flares out at the bottom, and the ground floor level brick banding, or rustication. Note the multiple paned bay windows: a distinctive front-facing one, and on the south side, one with a subtle curve.

Richard Foote Residence

9704 - 106 Street
Richard Foote was in Edmonton by the time a building boom began after 1903. The young bricklayer went to work on the Alberta Hotel on Jasper Avenue. Later, as a contractor, he led the construction of Edmonton's Civic Block, St. Mary's High School, Athabasca Hall at the University of Alberta, as well as the psychiatric hospital at Ponoka. Married twice with seven children, Foote served as an alderman from 1934 to 1936, and then worked as an assistant city building inspector, retiring four years before his death in 1948.
Foote built this Foursquare residence in 1907, and moved into it one year later. The overhanging eaves, open veranda, square columns, and symmetrical design typify the Prairie-style architecture of the era. Unique to Foote's design are the dormers and widow's walk on top of the pressed sheet metal bell cast roof that flares out at the bottom, and the ground floor level brick banding, or rustication. Note the multiple paned bay windows: a distinctive front-facing one, and on the south side, one with a subtle curve.

Roy Gerolamy Residence

9823 - 91 Avenue
This two-storey wood-frame residence was built by Roy Gerolamy in 1913 during the pre World War I building boom, for a cost of $2,200. The lot was purchased for $800.00. The address at the time of construction was 573 - 9th Avenue.
The Roy Gerolamy residence is an excellent example of the Foursquare style, which became popular during the Edwardian Era. It was typified by the use of symmetry and classical detailing. Foursquare homes are usually a two-storey box shape, with four square rooms above three square rooms and a foyer.
This structure has elaborate detailing and variations such as the slight hipped-roof configuration on the main house, upper open porch with bellcast eaves, asymmetrically located open front veranda with triple wood support posts, and two exterior brick chimneys. Decorative brackets on the soffit offer visual support and tie into the frieze that separates the roof from the shingles. The original multi-paned wood sash and storm windows add significant character to the home.
This residence is significant because of its association with the development of the Strathcona community, one of south Edmonton's oldest neighbourhoods dating from the arrival of the railway in 1892, and a separate city until amalgamation with Edmonton in 1912.

Roy Gerolamy Residence

9823 - 91 Avenue
This two-storey wood-frame residence was built by Roy Gerolamy in 1913 during the pre World War I building boom, for a cost of $2,200. The lot was purchased for $800.00. The address at the time of construction was 573 - 9th Avenue.
The Roy Gerolamy residence is an excellent example of the Foursquare style, which became popular during the Edwardian Era. It was typified by the use of symmetry and classical detailing. Foursquare homes are usually a two-storey box shape, with four square rooms above three square rooms and a foyer.
This structure has elaborate detailing and variations such as the slight hipped-roof configuration on the main house, upper open porch with bellcast eaves, asymmetrically located open front veranda with triple wood support posts, and two exterior brick chimneys. Decorative brackets on the soffit offer visual support and tie into the frieze that separates the roof from the shingles. The original multi-paned wood sash and storm windows add significant character to the home.
This residence is significant because of its association with the development of the Strathcona community, one of south Edmonton's oldest neighbourhoods dating from the arrival of the railway in 1892, and a separate city until amalgamation with Edmonton in 1912.

Holgate Mansion

6210 Ada Boulevard.
This residence was built in 1912 and designed by renowned Edmonton architects Arthur Nesbitt and Ernest Morehouse. The home was built for real estate developer Bidwell Holgate, who with business partner William Magrath, invested significant amounts of money into developing The Highlands district.
It is an excellent example of Edwardian architecture with Arts and Crafts and Tudor Revival influences. Exquisite finishing dominates the 5,500 square feet of living space. Oak flooring and paneling is found throughout the home which contains numerous architectural and design delights. A hand painted, linen wall covering with historical motifs, wraps around the main floor den. A built curved china cabinet, lady's mahogany parlour, pillared living room with hammered brass fireplace and more hand painted frescos can be found throughout the home. The exterior is brick on the lower portions and stucco on the upper floors.
Originally, a carriage house built before the First World War occupied part of the lot behind the house but was demolished a number of years ago.

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