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Archivistische beschrijving
Stuk Bridges
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High Level Bridge

Ezio Farone Park.
The High Level Bridge was designed by Phillips B. Motley, the Engineer of Bridges for the Canadian Pacific Railway, and was constructed between 1910 and 1913 at a cost of two million dollars. It was the first bridge in Canada to carry four different modes of traffic: rail, streetcar, automobile, and pedestrian. The first passenger train, seven cars long and carrying 200 passengers, crossed the bridge from Strathcona to Edmonton on June 2, 1913.
The structure is approximately one-half mile long (0.8 kilometre) and stands 152 feet (46.3 meters) above the mean river level. The construction of the bridge was a significant engineering achievement for the time, and the High Level Bridge remains a distinctive city landmark.

Edmonton, Yukon & Pacific Railway Bridge

Trestle Bridge, Mill Creek Ravine.
This wooden trestle bridge, built between 1900 and 1902, is one of the last physical reminders of the existence of the Edmonton, Yukon and Pacific Railway, the "shortest railroad with the longest name".
The E.Y.& P. Railway was the first to bring rail transportation to Edmonton. It was connected to the Canadian Pacific line south of Strathcona, and traveled north along Mill Creek ravine, then across the Low Level Bridge. The first train crossed the bridge into Edmonton on October 20, 1902. By 1907, the line was extended westward where it connected with the new Canadian Northern main line.
The E.Y.& P's passenger service was suspended in 1928. The line was used to haul coal and freight until 1954, when it closed and the tracks were removed.

Edmonton, Yukon & Pacific Railway Bridge

Trestle Bridge, Mill Creek Ravine.
This wooden trestle bridge, built between 1900 and 1902, is one of the last physical reminders of the existence of the Edmonton, Yukon and Pacific Railway, the "shortest railroad with the longest name".
The E.Y.& P. Railway was the first to bring rail transportation to Edmonton. It was connected to the Canadian Pacific line south of Strathcona, and traveled north along Mill Creek ravine, then across the Low Level Bridge. The first train crossed the bridge into Edmonton on October 20, 1902. By 1907, the line was extended westward where it connected with the new Canadian Northern main line.
The E.Y.& P's passenger service was suspended in 1928. The line was used to haul coal and freight until 1954, when it closed and the tracks were removed.

Edmonton, Yukon & Pacific Railway Bridge

Trestle Bridge, Mill Creek Ravine.
This wooden trestle bridge, built between 1900 and 1902, is one of the last physical reminders of the existence of the Edmonton, Yukon and Pacific Railway, the "shortest railroad with the longest name".
The E.Y.& P. Railway was the first to bring rail transportation to Edmonton. It was connected to the Canadian Pacific line south of Strathcona, and traveled north along Mill Creek ravine, then across the Low Level Bridge. The first train crossed the bridge into Edmonton on October 20, 1902. By 1907, the line was extended westward where it connected with the new Canadian Northern main line.
The E.Y.& P's passenger service was suspended in 1928. The line was used to haul coal and freight until 1954, when it closed and the tracks were removed.

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