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Papal Visit

This sub-series contains records relating to the visit of Pope John Paul II to Edmonton in 1984. The records include planning documents from the Edmonton Ambulance Authority, as well as photographs of the event.

Operational Reports

This sub-series contains operational reports on major incidents responded to by the Edmonton Ambulance Authority, including the roller coaster accident at West Edmonton Mall, the Namao air crash, the Hinton train collision, and incidents at a Platinum Blonde concert and the Edmonton maximum security penitentiary.

Muttart Conservatory

Established in 1976, the Muttart Conservatory is a botanical garden owned and operated by the City of Edmonton. This subseries contains project files and meeting minutes created by staff at the Muttart Conservatory through the course of caring for the facility and providing programming for the public.

Universiade '83

The Parks and Recreation Department was very involved in the 1983 World University Games. The Department worked in conjunction with the Federation Internationale du Sportif Universitaire to schedule and prepare facilities for the games. The City of Edmonton also appointed an International Events Coordinator to deal almost exclusively with Universiade '83. The role of the Parks and Recreation Department also included finance and budgeting, transportation, and media and public relations.

This subseries includes administrative records including correspondence, reports, and minutes of committee meetings from the Universiade '83 Corporation and the City of Edmonton Parks and Recreation Department relating to the bid to host the 1983 World University Games and the subsequent organization of the event. There are also records relating to the organization and construction of facilities for Universiade '83, as well as correspondence, brochures, and programs from other major sporting events held in Edmonton and their relationship to Universiade '83. There are also bulletins, notices, and minutes of meetings from the Federation Internationale du Sportif Universitaire, and press clippings and media releases relating to Universiade '83.

Fort Edmonton Park

This sub-series contains records created in the planning and operation of Fort Edmonton Park. The material includes research, reports, proposals, and planning documents.

The sub-series also includes photographs taken of Fort Edmonton Park, John Walter Museum, the Historical Exhibits Building, the Cromdale Warehouse (former Cromdale Bus Barns), the Nature Centre, the C.W. Cross Residence at 12729 Stony Plain Road, the McCauley House at 10042 92 Street, general shots of Riverdale and the Edmonton skyline, and an interior photo of the Ukrainian Bookstore.

Fort Edmonton Park

Valley Zoo

This sub-series contains records created in the planning and operation of the Storyland Valley Zoo. The material includes correspondence as well as records relating to administration, strategic planning, facility and exhibit development, animal acquisition and care, programming, finances, personnel, external organizations, and media coverage.

The sub-series includes photographs of animals and zoo facilities around 1970 (EA-20-623 to EA-20-633), as well as postcards of Edmonton and photos of Fort Edmonton Park (EA-20-635 to EA-20-641), and historic photographs of the construction of the High Level Bridge, Fort Edmonton, the Legislature, and the Edmonton Ski Club (EA-20-642 to EA-20-645). The subseries also includes a set of postcards depicting the Valley Zoo from ca. 1970 (EA-20-5471 to EA-20-5500).

The file list was arranged by type of record.

Edmonton Valley Zoo

Recreation Facilities

This sub-series contains correspondence, reports, minutes, and other material relating to City recreation facilities. It also contains material from community organizations that worked closely with recreation facility staff.

Parks Administration

This sub-series consists of records relating to the provision, operation and maintenance of green space for Edmontonians such as parks, ravines and forestry, cemeteries, playgrounds, golf courses, and playing fields and the river valley. It includes subjects such as concessions, horticulture, boulevards, and weed and pest control. The records include surveys, reports, and studies relating to City lands.

Cemeteries

This sub-series consists of minutes, reports, correspondence, burial ledgers, monument and burial applications, agreements, and other records relating to the various functions performed by cemeteries operated by the City of Edmonton.

Most early cemeteries in Edmonton were private or created by religious organizations. It was not until 1914 that the City established Beechmount Cemetery as the first municipal graveyard. At this time there were three other private cemeteries operating within Edmonton's city limits, including Edmonton Cemetery, Mount Pleasant Cemetery, and Little Mountain Cemetery.

The Edmonton Cemetery Company was formed in 1886 and received a charter in the same year. It was a limited stock company with no dividends issued to stockholders. The Board of Directors consisted of many of the city's prominent men including Matt McCauley, Alex Taylor, George D. K. Kinnaird. The company acquired land from the Hudson's Bay reserve and established the grave yard south of 107th Avenue between 117th and 119th Streets. Later acquisitions expanded the grounds west and northward. In 1922 a large expansion to the west included a large reserve for a military field of honor around a Cross of Sacrifice, similar to those found in Europe, erected by the Veterans War Graves Commission. In 1932 a neo-classical Mausoleum was built on the north side of 107th Avenue. By the 1960s issues of financial viability and the need for perpetual care prompted the company to initiate negotiations to surrender their charter to the city. The transfer occurred in 1965.

Mount Pleasant Cemetery was a private burial ground in Strathcona. The first burials were in the 1890s, with the earliest marker showing 1893. The Strathcona Cemetery Company formed in 1900 to administer the cemetery. The City of Edmonton took over operation of this cemetery in 1941.

Little Mountain Cemetery was formed in 1895 as a church graveyard. Land was donated to Little Mountain Cemetery Company in 1900 and it became a public burial ground. After decades of financial struggle, the records were transferred to the City in 1981, and the City took the cemetery over in 1985.

As time progressed the City required more land for cemeteries. In 1972 the City purchased land off St. Albert Trail north of 137 Avenue. It was officially named Sturgeon Heights Memorial Park in 1986, then renamed Northern Lights Memorial Park in 1987. The first burial there occurred in 1989. In 1985 a piece of City owned land was chosen for the site of a future cemetery. It was officially named South Haven Cemetery in 1987 and opened the following year.

The most recent cemetery to come under the City's control is Clover Bar Cemetery, which was established in 1901 behind the Clover Bar Church. Homesteader W.H. Wilkinson donated his land for the cemetery and he and nine other local residents formed a cemetery company. The City of Edmonton took over the running of this cemetery in 1995.

The Health Department was responsible for cemetery operations from 1914 until 1929, at which time responsibility was transferred to the Engineering Department. In 1947 the newly created Parks Department took control. The Parks Department evolved to become the Parks and Recreation Department in 1962, and later the Community Services Department in 1997.

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