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McCauley Family fonds Anglais
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First Train Across Low Level Bridge

On photo: This is the first photo of the first train as she steamed over the bridge and touched the fertile soil of Edmonton. This is also the first train that crossed the North Saskatchewan River.

Officers

Likely Major Peter Aylen and the C Squadron of the Mounted Rifles.

Peter Aylen was father of Bernard Greer Aylen (who married Elizabeth Norquay, daughter of Julia Alberta McCauley).

Lower Ferry

Samuel McCauley and family arrived in Edmonton in April 1892 and Sam got a job running the Lower Ferry. This ferry was located in the vicinity of the Low Level Bridge. Another ferry was operated near 7th Street by John Walter.

Samuel McCauley is seated on the wagon, holding the head of a second horse. The small boy in the centre is Sam's son, Dan McCauley.

First Presbyterian Church Choir, Edmonton

Back row, standing, L to R: ? , ? , ? , Mr. Kelly, Mrs. Dunlop, Alex J.H. McCauley (organist), ? ,
Middle row, seated, L to R: ? , Mr. McKenzie, Rev. D.G. McQueen, ? , Annie Cookson (the second Mrs. Matthew McCauley)
Front row, seated, L to R: Mrs. Jimmy Douglas, ? , Margaret J. McCauley, Mrs. Fred Ross

Low Level Bridge

In the winter of 1898-1899 the piers for the Low Level Bridge, Edmonton's first bridge across the Saskatchewan, were built. Then in the spring of 1899 the river flooded, the water rising many feet over the top of the piers, with the result that another eight feet were added to them.
As the south pier was in the deepest part of the river, with a very swift current, it was necessary to install a pier, called an 'ice breaker', for its protection when the ice went out. This was placed a few rods up-river from the bridge pier and was put in during the winter of 1899 by Samuel McCauley.
When the ice went out in the spring of 1900, it was found that the ice breaker was not sufficient protection for the south pier and a 'nose' was then attached to the pier itself. This work was also done by Samuel McCauley.

This photo shows the beginning of the work installing the 'nose'. The icebreaker was demolished in 1960.

See also EA-430-4, EA-430-5 and EA-430-9.

Low Level Bridge

In the winter of 1898-1899 the piers for the Low Level Bridge, Edmonton's first bridge across the Saskatchewan, were built. Then in the spring of 1899 the river flooded, the water rising many feet over the top of the piers, with the result that another eight feet were added to them.
As the south pier was in the deepest part of the river, with a very swift current, it was necessary to install a pier, called an 'ice breaker', for its protection when the ice went out. This was placed a few rods up-river from the bridge pier and was put in during the winter of 1899 by Samuel McCauley.
When the ice went out in the spring of 1900, it was found that the ice breaker was not sufficient protection for the south pier and a 'nose' was then attached to the pier itself. This work was also done by Samuel McCauley.

This photo shows the beginning of the work installing the 'nose'. The icebreaker was demolished in 1960.

See also EA-430-3, EA-430-5 and EA-430-9.

Low Level Bridge

In the winter of 1898-1899 the piers for the Low Level Bridge, Edmonton's first bridge across the Saskatchewan, were built. Then in the spring of 1899 the river flooded, the water rising many feet over the top of the piers, with the result that another eight feet were added to them.
As the south pier was in the deepest part of the river, with a very swift current, it was necessary to install a pier, called an 'ice breaker', for its protection when the ice went out. This was placed a few rods up-river from the bridge pier and was put in during the winter of 1899 by Samuel McCauley.
When the ice went out in the spring of 1900, it was found that the ice breaker was not sufficient protection for the south pier and a 'nose' was then attached to the pier itself. This work was also done by Samuel McCauley.

This photo shows the beginning of the work installing the 'nose'. The icebreaker was demolished in 1960.

See also EA-430-3, EA-430-4 and EA-430-9.

The Six-Wheeled Wagon - Necessity The Mother of Invention

This boiler was being taken to Morinville in the summer of 1901 by Samuel McCauley. The purpose of the third set of wheels [on the wagon] is to carry the load when the other hind wheels settled into the muskeg. In spite of this, the boiler had to be left somewhere on the trail (St. Albert Trail?) and the job finished after the freeze-up.

Photo taken on 100th Street (site of former home of Samuel McCauley, later the Land Titles Office).

George West is on the wagon, Dan McCauley driving the team of the next boiler, Samuel McCauley beside the boiler, Bill Desfrese with Dan's Pinto.

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