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City of Edmonton. Parks and Recreation Department fonds Houses Anglais
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Bard Residence & Carriage House

10544 - 84 Avenue. On May 21, 1912 Delmar Bard obtained building permit number 259 to construct this wonderful neo-Georgian style home. The permit listed Mr. Bard as the contractor and Mr. L. Keith as architect, and the cost was estimated at $6,500. Once completed this 2.5 storey, 427 square metre residence was an outstanding addition to this area.
Delmar Bard came from the American mid-west to Alberta in 1896. He worked at various occupations including Indian agent, provincial roads and bridge inspector and real estate speculator. His ingenuity is reflected in several aspects of the house. One main feature of the home is a built-in central vacuum system. Also, he installed an automobile turntable in front of the garage so he would not have to reverse his vehicle out of the driveway. This has since been removed.
The interior of the home is lavishly furnished with period stained glass windows imported from France. Fine oak woodwork is found throughout the home and the ceilings are trimmed with dentilled moulding. Built-in bookcases, leatherette wallpaper, and some period light fixtures add to the charm of this residence.
Following Delmar's death in 1938, the home was subdivided into suites. These divisions were later removed by Sue Bard, granddaughter of the original owner.

Bard Residence - Front

10544 - 84 Avenue. On May 21, 1912 Delmar Bard obtained building permit number 259 to construct this wonderful neo-Georgian style home. The permit listed Mr. Bard as the contractor and Mr. L. Keith as architect, and the cost was estimated at $6,500. Once completed this 2.5 storey, 427 square metre residence was an outstanding addition to this area.
Delmar Bard came from the American mid-west to Alberta in 1896. He worked at various occupations including Indian agent, provincial roads and bridge inspector and real estate speculator. His ingenuity is reflected in several aspects of the house. One main feature of the home is a built-in central vacuum system. Also, he installed an automobile turntable in front of the garage so he would not have to reverse his vehicle out of the driveway. This has since been removed.
The interior of the home is lavishly furnished with period stained glass windows imported from France. Fine oak woodwork is found throughout the home and the ceilings are trimmed with dentilled moulding. Built-in bookcases, leatherette wallpaper, and some period light fixtures add to the charm of this residence.
Following Delmar's death in 1938, the home was subdivided into suites. These divisions were later removed by Sue Bard, granddaughter of the original owner.

Cecil Scott Burgess Residence / Frank Michelet Residence

10958 - 89 Avenue.
The Craftsman-style architecture represented by this house was popular in the city during the time of its construction, circa 1912. The photograph shows it as it was in 1933. Design elements include: the gable roof configuration, side dormers, central brick chimney, triangular eave brackets, wooden double-hung windows, and the hipped-roof open verandah with solid handrails. Of special note is the symmetrical arrangement of upper floor main windows and corner 'eye' windows in the front facade.
The house is significant because of its associations with Cecil Scott Burgess (1870-1971) and Percival Sidney Warren (1890-1970).
Mr. Burgess lived here from 1941. He joined the University of Alberta in 1913 when he was appointed resident architect and professor of architecture. He designed and supervised the construction of many early campus buildings including the Arts Building, Pembina Hall and the staff Ring Houses. His legacy is further evident in the Rutherford Library and the Students' Union Building, which were designed by his students. Mr. Burgess' influence was felt beyond the borders of the University of Alberta campus. He was for thirty years a member of the Council of the Alberta Association of Architects. He designed the Bowker Building and the Birks Building, recognized as significant contributions to this city's architecture.

Arthur Davies Residence - East

10606 - 84 Avenue
This large brick Queen Anne style residence was built in about the year 1907 by Arthur Davies.
Mr. Davies was prominent in Strathcona's commercial and political life after 1895, and his grocery emporium was well known. He served as Strathcona's mayor in 1905 and once again in 1911, overseeing the amalgamation of the Cities of Strathcona and Edmonton. Mr. Davies earned recognition as the "Father of Greater Edmonton".
The Davies house design incorporates twin, two storey bow windows and classical details including sandstone string courses and lintels. A second storey balcony is supported by Tuscan columns from the porch below, and the underside of the roof.

Hugh Duncan Residence

8520 - 104 Street
Hugh Duncan commissioned John Sanford to build a large, embellished version of a Foursquare home for his family here in 1911. At the time, the Edwardian era Foursquares were the most popular house style on the prairies, projecting a modest dignity: symmetrical and simplistic in ornamentation, yet lavish in stature and domesticity. This house features a flared bell cast roof with curved dormer windows, tapered posts supporting a full-length open veranda, a projected front door entrance, a north-facing bay window, and keystone details above the ground floor windows.
Hugh and Clara Duncan, together with their children Edgar, Grace, and Brock, truly made what was then 60 Main Street North a fine home after it was completed in 1912. Edgar, wounded in Passchendaele during the First World War, returned here to study engineering at the University of Alberta. Brock followed in his father's footsteps, and established the Jasper Place Pharmacy. He later took over his father's business, Duncan's Drug Store on Whyte Avenue, after Hugh's death in 1935. Grace became a teacher and lived here with her family until the city bought the house in the 1960s.
Two decades later, the Old Strathcona Foundation purchased and renovated the residence for use as its organizational headquarters.

George Durrand Residence

10417 Saskatchewan Drive.
The Durrand Residence is valued for its association with the Durrand family, who were representative of the type of entrepreneurial and professional families that began to populate the city of Strathcona early in the twentieth century. The house was later home to Harold Gould Macdonald, a noted Edmontonian and founder of the H.G. Macdonald Company of contractors that has grown into the well-recognized firm of Christensen and Macdonald. He lived in the house until 1923.

George Durrand Residence - SE

10417 Saskatchewan Drive.
The Durrand Residence is valued for its association with the Durrand family, who were representative of the type of entrepreneurial and professional families that began to populate the city of Strathcona early in the twentieth century. The house was later home to Harold Gould Macdonald, a noted Edmontonian and founder of the H.G. Macdonald Company of contractors that has grown into the well-recognized firm of Christensen and Macdonald. He lived in the house until 1923.

Richard Foote Residence - SE

9704 - 106 Street
Richard Foote was in Edmonton by the time a building boom began after 1903. The young bricklayer went to work on the Alberta Hotel on Jasper Avenue. Later, as a contractor, he led the construction of Edmonton's Civic Block, St. Mary's High School, Athabasca Hall at the University of Alberta, as well as the psychiatric hospital at Ponoka. Married twice with seven children, Foote served as an alderman from 1934 to 1936, and then worked as an assistant city building inspector, retiring four years before his death in 1948.
Foote built this Foursquare residence in 1907, and moved into it one year later. The overhanging eaves, open veranda, square columns, and symmetrical design typify the Prairie-style architecture of the era. Unique to Foote's design are the dormers and widow's walk on top of the pressed sheet metal bell cast roof that flares out at the bottom, and the ground floor level brick banding, or rustication. Note the multiple paned bay windows: a distinctive front-facing one, and on the south side, one with a subtle curve.

Holgate Mansion

6210 Ada Boulevard.
This residence was built in 1912 and designed by renowned Edmonton architects Arthur Nesbitt and Ernest Morehouse. The home was built for real estate developer Bidwell Holgate, who with business partner William Magrath, invested significant amounts of money into developing The Highlands district.
It is an excellent example of Edwardian architecture with Arts and Crafts and Tudor Revival influences. Exquisite finishing dominates the 5,500 square feet of living space. Oak flooring and paneling is found throughout the home which contains numerous architectural and design delights. A hand painted, linen wall covering with historical motifs, wraps around the main floor den. A built curved china cabinet, lady's mahogany parlour, pillared living room with hammered brass fireplace and more hand painted frescos can be found throughout the home. The exterior is brick on the lower portions and stucco on the upper floors.
Originally, a carriage house built before the First World War occupied part of the lot behind the house but was demolished a number of years ago.

Hyndman House

10123 - 136 Street.
This house is the work of prominent Edmonton architect, George Heath MacDonald, who had already designed several of the city's important public buildings in the neo-classical style. However on this project he experimented with modernism, seeming to incorporate some elements of Art Deco, Moderne, and International Style.
MacDonald worked on this house for his friend Lou Hyndman. Born in Edmonton in 1904, Hyndman practiced law in the city after graduating from the University of Alberta. Premier E.C. Manning appointed him Master in Chambers in the Alberta Supreme Court, a position he held for more than twenty-five years. Hyndman chaired the Edmonton Planning Committee, and served on the Edmonton Public School Board. Louis and Muriel's son Lou Hyndman Jr. became well known as the MLA for Glenora and as provincial treasurer in the Lougheed government. The family owned this home from 1946 to 2002.

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