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Fort Edmonton Park

  • RG-21-SB-4.3
  • Pessoa coletiva
  • 1967-

Fort Edmonton Park was approved in principle by City Council in 1966. In 1967 Fort Edmonton Park was under the auspices of the Parks and Recreation Department’s Historical Division. In order to develop as authentic an experience as possible, the creation of Fort Edmonton Park generated an extraordinary amount of research concerning Edmonton’s past. The Fort officially opened in 1974, and expanded over the next decades.

Fort Edmonton Park is owned by the City of Edmonton. They are supported by the Fort Edmonton Historical Foundation, a charitable organization established in 1969 to promote the creation and development of the park; to assist in the preservation of buildings, artifacts, and records; to establish and maintain a fund to do this work, including taking donations; and to apply the capital and income of the funds for this purpose.

In 2009, City Council approved the creation of the Fort Edmonton Management Company, to operate and manage the Park. Responsibilities of the Company include the development of all capital projects subject to the approval of City Council.

Edmonton Valley Zoo

  • RG-21-SB-4.2
  • Pessoa coletiva
  • 1959-

The Edmonton Zoological Society was created in 1926 by a group of like-minded citizens who established a zoo in Borden Park. In 1930 the City took over maintenance of the zoo at Borden Park, while the Zoological Society maintained an advisory role. By the late 1940s Borden Park was no longer deemed suitable as a location for a zoo, and in 1950 the City began looking at alternative sites. In 1956 the City decided to build a children’s zoo in Laurier Park. By August, 1958 plans had been made to add story-book characters to zoo. The plan was to have a five acre children’s zoo, two lagoons, a bridge, a mini railway, and illustrations with animals of storybook characters. In November, 1958 Council suggested creating a Zoo Advisory Board to help guide the zoo.

The Storyland Valley Zoo opened in summer of 1959 as a small children’s zoo featuring a variety of animals and other attractions, all presented around a storybook theme. The zoo was operated by a supervisor under the Parks Department (1959-1961), with assistance from the Zoo Advisory Board, which provided advice to City Council in connection to projects and policies relating to zoological issues. The zoo became part of the Parks and Recreation Department when it was established in 1962. It continued to be operated independently from the other administrative units within the Department until around 1968, when it became part of the Revenue Programs Division of the Recreation Branch. Other sections included aquatics, arenas, ski hills, golf courses, concessions, and the Planetarium. By 1980 the Zoo had moved to the Major Facilities Branch, where it remained until 1997, when another major reorganization which moved the Zoo to the newly formed Recreational Facilities Branch of the Community Services Department.

Since its creation the Storyland Valley Zoo has continued to grow. In 1963 a master plan was prepared to develop an additional 100 acres, and in 1965 the Winter Quarters were built. In 1973 additional exhibitions were planned, though they were not constructed due to a lack of funds. A feasibility study was conducted in 1975, a new master plan in 1977, and another in 1979. In 1980 an architectural firm was hired to begin planning for a major addition to the zoo, which caused considerable controversy for several years among members of the community and the city at large. In response, a Citizen’s Zoo Advisory Committee was established in October, 1981 to determine and assess concerns around zoo expansion.

The most recent major addition to the zoo was a $43 million project announced in 2010 which saw the remaining storyland elements removed and new state of the art facilities built (the term “Storyland” had been dropped from the name in 1975). The renovation was paid for in part by the Valley Zoo Development Society, a registered charity and not-for-profit that was started in 1988 and which acts in partnership with the City of Edmonton to ensure the continued development of the Valley Zoo.

The City of Edmonton Archives

  • RG-21-SB-2.4
  • Pessoa coletiva
  • 1966-

In 1966 Bylaw 1161 was repealed and replaced with Bylaw 2823, creating the Edmonton Historical Board, with almost identical roles and responsibilities to the City of Edmonton Archives and Landmarks Committee. It served in an advisory role to discover, select, index, catalogue and prepare for safe keeping, reference and suitable display all books, charts, maps, papers, photographs, paintings, property, chattels or objects of any description relating to the history, alteration and development of the City of Edmonton, including recommending purchases, housing and displaying of such material.

The Archives Policy was approved by City Council on April 5, 1971. It formally established the City Archives under the jurisdiction of the Parks and Recreation Department. The Archives’ objectives included acquiring, preserving, and making accessible records relating to the history of Edmonton, particularly those records relating to business conducted by the City of Edmonton. The Archives was also charged with increasing public interest and knowledge of Edmonton’s history through exhibition and displays. Archives staff worked closely with members of the Edmonton Historical Board, as well as staff at the Artifacts Centre, John Walter Museum, and Fort Edmonton Park.

City of Edmonton Archives

  • RG-21-SB-2.4
  • Pessoa coletiva
  • 1966-

In 1966 Bylaw 1161 was repealed and replaced with Bylaw 2823, creating the Edmonton Historical Board, with almost identical roles and responsibilities to the City of Edmonton Archives and Landmarks Committee. It served in an advisory role to discover, select, index, catalogue and prepare for safe keeping, reference and suitable display all books, charts, maps, papers, photographs, paintings, property, chattels or objects of any description relating to the history, alteration and development of the City of Edmonton, including recommending purchases, housing and displaying of such material.

The Archives Policy was approved by City Council on April 5, 1971. It formally established the City Archives under the jurisdiction of the Parks and Recreation Department. The Archives’ objectives included acquiring, preserving, and making accessible records relating to the history of Edmonton, particularly those records relating to business conducted by the City of Edmonton. The Archives was also charged with increasing public interest and knowledge of Edmonton’s history through exhibition and displays. Archives staff worked closely with members of the Edmonton Historical Board, as well as staff at the Artifacts Centre, John Walter Museum, and Fort Edmonton Park.

Edmonton Historical Board

  • RG-21-SB-2.3
  • Pessoa coletiva
  • 1966-

On May 24, 1966 Bylaw No. 2823 was passed to establish the Edmonton Historical Board. The Board was meant to act in an advisory capacity to City Council in order to discover, select, acquire, index, catalogue, and prepare for safe keeping, reference, and suitable display records and artifacts relating to the history of the City of Edmonton. They also recommended the purchase of property and recommended the employment of people to collect, catalogue, and display material received. In August of that year the Board requested to be under the Parks and Recreation Department.

In 1971 the City Archives and City Artifacts Centre were established out of the Edmonton Historical Board, alleviating the board from the responsibility of collecting historic records and artifacts.

The Board also advised on the designation and preservation of historical buildings, streetscapes, and communities, serve as a liaison between Council and community groups on historical matters, and raise awareness of Edmonton’s history. The Historical Sites Selection Committee was established in 1974, and given responsibility for selecting which sites in the City would be considered historically significant. In 1983 the maintenance of the Register of Heritage Buildings was added to the Board’s responsibilities.

The Board also recommended to Council the most suitable ways of displaying historical material collected by the City, the erection of historical plaques and markers, and the recognition of individuals and groups who have contributed to Edmonton’s history. The first recognition awards were given out in 1975.

Other board activities have included special projects like the publication of books, overseeing special events, and coordinating with other heritage organizations such as the Society for the Preservation of Architectural Resources in Edmonton (SPARE), Fort Edmonton Park via the Honourary Chief Factor, the Alberta Historical Resources Foundation, the Edmonton Heritage Network, the Old Strathcona Foundation, the Northern Alberta Pioneers and Old Timers Association, the Edmonton and District Historical Society, and the City of Edmonton Naming Committee.

Archives and Landmarks Committee

  • RG-21-SB-2.2
  • Pessoa coletiva
  • 1947-1966

On November 9, 1946, Alderman James Harwood Ogilvie requested a report on the status of the City of Edmonton Archives Committee (RG 8.6-146/1). This appears to have initiated renewed interest in archives and historical issues by the City, leading to the passage of Bylaw 1121, establishing the City of Edmonton Archives Committee, January 27, 1947, later amended by Bylaw 1161, to change the name to City of Edmonton Archives and Landmarks Committee, March 8, 1948.

The Committee consisted of eight members, each serving a two year term, capable of being renewed. Under the bylaw, the Committee had an advisory role to discover, select, index, catalogue and prepare for safe keeping, reference and suitable display all books, charts, maps, papers, photographs, paintings, property, chattels or objects of any description relating to the history, alteration and development of the City of Edmonton including recommending purchases, housing and displaying of such material. The Committee continued in existence until May 24, 1966 when Bylaw 1161 was repealed and replaced with Bylaw 2823, creating the Edmonton Historical Board, with almost identical roles and responsibilities.

Archives Committee

  • RG-21-SB-2.1
  • Pessoa coletiva
  • 1938-[ca.1944]

The City of Edmonton Archives Committee was created by a resolution of City Council, September 26, 1938. The resolution stated: “That a Committee be set up to have charge of the Archives of the City, consisting of the senior of the Commissioners and two other citizens to be selected by council, same to be a permanent committee on Archives.” It can be construed to be limited to the archival records of the city, but the committee appears to have immediately expanded the mandate to acquire documentation and artifacts about the history of Edmonton (minutes, December 1, 1938).

The committee members, appointed by resolution of City Council, October 24, 1938, consisted originally of Albert Edward Ottewell, Registrar, University of Alberta, as Chairman; John Blue, Secretary, Edmonton Chamber of Commerce (formerly Alberta Provincial Librarian); and R.J. Gibb; City Commissioner; with Alfred Russell, City Clerk serving as Secretary and, initially, Custodian. The membership was expanded by resolution of Council, October 10, 1939, to include Hugh C. Gourlay, City Librarian, who also became City Archivist (minutes, September 11, 1940, p. 1).

The Committee appears to have become moribund sometime after the September 11, 1940 meeting. The only other records of activity relate to actions of Hugh Gourlay to identify space in the City Library for archival storage (December 1944). The committee continued to be listed in official City organization documents until 1944, but disappears from the 1945 lists.

Edmonton Transit System

  • AR-RG-90
  • Pessoa coletiva
  • 1946-1971

The idea of local public transportation began in 1893 when the North West Territories Council approved “An Ordinance to Empower the Municipality of the Town of Edmonton to Construct and Operate a Tramway”. However, public transit was not established until 1908, when the City of Edmonton purchased the Strathcona Radial Tramway Company, a private venture that was slated to start a local railway before being bought out through Bylaw. A second bylaw ratified the establishment of the Edmonton Radial Railway shortly thereafter – Bylaw 185.

From 1904 until 1971 this department had a number of names. Until 1946 it was called variously the Edmonton Radial Railway or the Street Railway Department. On July 16, 1946 the name was changed to the Edmonton Transportation System, to reflect the changing nature of the department, specifically the large number buses that now made up the fleet. On April 29, 1947 the name was shortened to the Edmonton Transit System.

The Edmonton Transit System merged with the Engineer’s Department in 1971 to form the Engineering and Transportation Department. This was in reaction to the provincial City Transportation Act, passed in 1970, which required cities to undertake transportation studies to ensure transportation needs were met. In 1976 the independent Transit Department was formed from the Transit Branch of the Engineering and Transportation Department. However, the independence was short lived, and on January 1, 1984 the Transit Department, the Engineering Department, and the Transportation Management Department merged to form the Transportation Department. The former Transit Department was now the Edmonton Transit Branch of the Transportation Department. The Transportation Department was reorganized and renamed the Transportation and Streets Department in 1997. On June 1, 2011 as part of a large-scale reorganization within the City, the Transportation and Streets Department was renamed Transportation Services. In 2016, this department was reorganized again to become the City Operations Department.

Edmonton Power

  • AR-RG-80
  • Pessoa coletiva
  • 1967-1992

The Edmonton Power Department was responsible for providing safe, reliable, cost-effective electric service to residential, commercial and industrial customers in Edmonton.

In 1902 the Edmonton Electric Lighting and Power Company applied to the Town of Edmonton to renew their 10 year franchise. In response to concerns over occasional service interruption, the Town purchased the company outright and it became the first municipally owned electric utility in Canada (Bylaw 221: A Bylaw to Purchase the Power Plant and other Property of the Edmonton Electric Lighting and Power).

The Electrical Distribution System was renamed Edmonton Power in 1967. The name change was accompanied by a reorganization of the department to more effectively carry out the numerous capital programs scheduled to keep up with Edmonton’s rapid growth. In 1970 power generation was added to the department’s responsibilities when the Power Plant Department was absorbed by Edmonton Power.

In 1991 City Council initiated a review process to determine the best way in which to move forward with the operation of the utility. In 1992 it was determined that Edmonton Power should be incorporated, and the City would be the single shareholder of the new corporation. A Board of Authority was appointed to oversee Edmonton Power until December 31, 1992. On January 1, 1993 the Edmonton Power Authority, under a Board of Directors, was officially established.

The Province of Alberta passed the “Electric Utilities Act” in May, 1995 and it took effect January 1, 1996. This act deregulated the power industry in Alberta in an attempt to improve customer service and lower prices for the consumer. As a result of this Act Edmonton Power had to hasten their transition from a bureaucracy to an independent business. In 1995 the City of Edmonton transferred the responsibilities for assets, banking, risk management and collective bargaining to EPCOR, thus enabling the company’s incorporation effective officially January 1, 1996.

Public Affairs Committee

  • AR-RG-8-S-8.7
  • Pessoa coletiva
  • 1968-[ca. 1990]

Specially appointed committees were struck to meet the needs of the City Council to respond to specific issues arising from the business of the City. Calls for investigation of administrative matters, organization of public meetings, special commemorative events, or fact finding to answer questions raised by aldermen led to the appointment of short-term committees. By 1915, many of these committees such as the Finance Committee and the Negotiating Committee were routinely appointed each year. Other committees had shorter lifespans, or changed name and focus as the needs of the City Council changed.

After the October 1968 election the Public Works standing committee was established, composed of Aldermen Leger (Chair), McCallum, Newman, and Ward (replaced by Alderman Kiniski in 1970). After the election of October, 1971 the committee was renamed the Public Affairs Committee. Between 1971 and 1974 the committee comprised of Aldermen Hayter, McLean, Evans and Tanner, and Commissioner Burrows.

The Public Affairs Committee was active until at least 1990.

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