Showing 448 results

Authority record

Card, Brigham Young

  • AR-MS-250
  • Person
  • 1914 - 2006

Brigham Young Card was born in Cardston, Alberta on March 11, 1914. He is the great-grandson of the prominent Mormon leader, Brigham Young, and the grandson of Charles Ora Card, who led a group of Mormon settlers from Utah to Southern Alberta to settle in the area later named Cardston in honour of the Card family. Card studied science at the University of Utah and the University of Alberta, and served as a Mormon missionary to French-speaking Switzerland from 1938-1940. In 1959, Card received his Ph. D. from Stanford University with a dissertation entitled "American Educational Sociology from 1890-1950 - A Sociological Analysis." He began lecturing at the University of Alberta in 1950, teaching the only sociology course offered at the University. His research focused primarily on social change in Western Canadian communities, and with comparative sociology of education. While at the University of Alberta, he helped organize the Campus Cooperative Residence, the LDS Club, the Department of Educational Foundations, Intercultural Education, Community Development, and Community Education. After a long and active research and teaching career with the University of Alberta, Card retired as Professor Emeritus of the Department of Educational Foundations in 1979. He was an adjunct professor at Brigham Young University from 1980-1981, and taught at Red Deer College from 1981-1984. In 1984, he was awarded the Sir Frederick Haultain Prize in social sciences for introducing and developing the field of educational sociology in Alberta. Card died in 2006 and is interred in Casper, Wyoming.

Carlyle, William Thomas

  • AR-MS-80
  • Person
  • [ca. 1900] - 1992

Dr. William Thomas Carlyle was born in Ontario and moved to Edmonton in 1913. He attended the University of Alberta and the University of Toronto, where he obtained a doctorate in veterinary science. He was employed as a veterinarian by the British Columbia Department of Agriculture, Williams Lake BC, the Dominion Livestock Board, Calgary AB, and Al Oemings' Game Farm, Edmonton AB. He was a director of the Alberta Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA), and its Northern Alberta branch. Dr. Carlyle's other interests were natural history and the history of Alberta. He was active in the Alberta Natural History Society, Edmonton Natural History Club, Historical Society of Alberta, Edmonton Camera Club, and Gateway Camera Club. He married Helen Clare [?], and they had one son. Dr. Carlyle died on February 11, 1992.

Carmichael, Beatrice

  • AR-MS-223
  • Person
  • 1889 - 1964

Beatrice Carmichael was one of Edmonton's leading musical directors and promoters for over 30 years. Born Beatrice Van Loon in 1889 at Southbend, Indiana, she made her first soprano debut at the age of four. At the age of sixteen, she conducted her first orchestra and then obtained her bachelor of music degree from the University of Chicago. In 1919, she came to Edmonton for an engagement at the Mcdonald Hotel where she met her future husband. Settling in Edmonton she worked with the Women's Musical Club, gave violin lessons, and played with the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra. In 1935 she founded the Edmonton Civic Opera Society and she was its only musical director for almost 30 years. Beatrice Carmichael died in 1964, having made an outstanding contribution to music in Edmonton.

Cavanagh, Terry

  • AR-RG-6-S-7
  • Person
  • 1926-2017

Terence (Terry) James Cavanagh was born in Edmonton in 1926. He first ran for municipal office in 1968, but did not win a seat as an Alderman. He ran again in 1971, this time winning a seat, and was re-elected as an Alderman in 1974. When William Hawrelak died in office in 1975, Terry Cavanagh was chosen by City Council to serve as Mayor until the 1977 election. Although he ran for Mayor in 1977, he lost to Cec Purves.

Terry Cavanagh ran again for Council several years later, winning a seat in 1983 and again in 1986. When Mayor Laurence Decore stepped down to run for the Alberta Liberal Party, Cavanagh was selected by Council to serve as Mayor, but was defeated by Jan Reimer in the 1989 election.

Cavanagh was elected to Council again in 1992, and was re-elected in 1995, 1998, 2001, and 2004. He retired from municipal politics after deciding not to run in the 2007 election.

Cavanaugh, Terry

  • AR-RG-6-S-7
  • Person
  • 1926-

Terence (Terry) James Cavanaugh was born in Edmonton in 1926. He first ran for municipal office in 1968, but did not win a seat as an Alderman. He ran again in 1971, this time winning a seat, and was re-elected as an Alderman in 1974. When William Hawrelak died in office in 1975, Terry Cavanaugh was chosen by City Council to serve as Mayor until the 1977 election. Although he ran for Mayor in 1977, he lost to Cec Purves.

Terry Cavanaugh ran again for Council several years later, winning a seat in 1983 and again in 1986. When Mayor Laurence Decore stepped down to run for the Alberta Liberal Party, Cavanaugh was selected by Council to serve as Mayor, but was defeated by Jan Reimer in the 1989 election.

Cavanaugh was elected to Council again in 1992, and was re-elected in 1995, 1998, 2001, and 2004. He retired from municipal politics after deciding not to run in the 2007 election.

Cavers, Charters Family

  • AR-MS-138
  • Family
  • 1863-1973

Cavers, Mary Beatrice 1888-1976
Cavers, Mary Miller 1863-1910
Charters, Charles 1875-1966
Charters, Christina Jean Cavers 1900-1973
Charters, Everett Eldbridge 1902-1972
Charters, Kenneth 1978-1944
Charters, Margaret Everett 1875-1963
Strachan, Marion Charters ca. 1930-current

Christina ('Chrissie') Jean Cavers was born 13 Dec 1900 to Mary Miller and Edmond Cavers in the municipality of Louise, Manitoba. Christine had six siblings - Mary, Thomas, John, Hugh, Nettie and Ann. By 1921, Chrissie was working as a teacher in Qu'Appelle, Saskatchewan.

Everett Eldbridge Charters was born 6 May 1902 to Margaret Everett and Charles Charters in Sunbury County, New Brunswick. Everett had seven siblings - Murray, Edna, Susan, Margaret, Leslie, Ralph and Rupert. By 1911, the family had moved to Kindersley, Saskatchewan.

In the mid 1920's, Christina Cavers married Everett Charters, likely in Saskatchewan. They had two children, Kenneth and Marion. Chrissie and Everett raised their family in Viscount, Saskatchewan, where Everett worked as a mechanic.

In 1969, Christina and Everett's son, Kenneth Charters, moved with his wife and children to Alberta. The family settled in St. Albert, and Kenneth worked in Edmonton as a mechanic and parts purchasing agent. Chrissie and Everett followed their son's move to Alberta. By 1971, Christina and Everett Charters were living in the Imperial Towers apartment on 101 Ave., in Edmonton, where Chrissie also worked as the janitor.

Christina and Everett's son, Kenneth, died 7 Feb 1972 in Edmonton at the age of 44. Everett Charters died a few months later on 27 Jun 1972. Christina retired and moved into the Meadowcroft Seniors Residence.

Christina Jean Cavers Charters died 9 Feb 1973 in Edmonton.

Chimo Youth Retreat Centre

  • AR-MS-90
  • Corporate body
  • 1970-current

The Chimo Youth Retreat Centre began operation in 1970 in order to provide a shelter and counseling for troubled youths between the ages of 14 and 18 in Edmonton. By 1976, the Chimo Youth Centre was operating three residences in Edmonton for at-risk youth. The Chimo Youth Retreat Centre works with community partners to assist young people on the road to independence. Their offices are located in downtown Edmonton.

Citizens Action Centre

  • AR-RG-7-S-2
  • Corporate body
  • 1980-2008

The Citizens Action Centre was established in 1980 under the Public Relations Department and became an independent entity in 1982 when the Public Relations Department was dissolved and its functions split between the new Corporate Communications Department and the independent Citizens Action Centre. Around 1984 or 1985 the Citizens Action Centre became a unit under the Corporate Communications section of the City Manager's Office. This arrangement lasted until 1997, when the City '97 reorganization moved both functions to the Corporate Services Department. This relationship lasted until at least 2007. In 2008 the Citizens Action Centre was dissolved and its function absorbed by the new 311 Call Centre, operated by Corporate Services.

The Citizens Action Centre provided a place for residents to contact if they could not find the correct department to speak with, or who were unsatisfied with the response they received from City staff. It soon evolved to become the first point of contact for most citizens.

The Chief Officer of the Citizen's Action Centre was Bette Loree, who ensured that a great deal of material pertaining to events in Edmonton was transferred to the City of Edmonton Archives, including an extensive collection of posters which the Citizens Action Centre presumably received as promotional material to display at City Hall.

Citizens' Cenotaph Committee

  • AR-MS-86
  • Corporate body
  • 1935-1946

The Citizens Cenotaph Committee was created in 1935 to complete the project to erect a cenotaph to honour the war dead of World War I that had been initiated by an earlier committee ca. 1929. It raised funds by public subscription and the cenotaph was unveiled by Lord Tweedsmuir, Governor-General of Canada, at a ceremony on Aug. 13, 1936. It was re-dedicated by Viscount Alexander of Tunis, Governor-General of Canada, on Aug. 26, 1946, to honour the war dead of World War II.

City Architect and Building Inspector's Department

  • AR-RG-16
  • Corporate body
  • 1909-1970

The Department for the Inspection of Buildings was established in 1909 by Bylaw 207. Prior to this the City employed a Building and Fire Inspector and a Plumbing Inspector, but they did not operate independently, and were likely part of the Engineer’s Department.

The Department for the Inspection of Buildings was responsible for the enforcement of building codes; providing building permits; the survey and inspection of buildings, scaffolding, and building sites; recording complaints made to the office; and the protection of buildings against fires and accident.

When it was established in 1909 the Department for the Inspection of Buildings was led the Inspector of Buildings. This position led the department until 1926, when building inspector Norman A. McIvor died while in office and was replaced by John Martland. Martland had been employed as the architect with the Engineer’s Department. In accepting the new position he was expected to continue his previous duties as well as fulfill those of the building inspector. It was at this time that the department became the Architect’s and Building Inspector’s Department, and the head became the City Architect and Building Inspector.

As of 1931, this department was responsible for providing plumbing permits, gas permits, moving permits, curb pump permits, and sign permits in addition to building permits. The department was also responsible for janitorial work at City buildings, and operation of the elevator at Civic Block.

By the 1950s the department’s responsibilities had grown. In 1952 the mandate of the Architect’s and Building Inspector’s Department was to provide architectural services for City buildings, approve building plans and issue permits, issue overhead sign permits, conduct inspections on construction to ensure City building code was being followed, conduct exams for trades certificates (but not for electricians), make recommendations concerning construction bylaws, the maintenance of civic buildings (except utilities and engineering departments) and provide mail service to City offices.

In 1957 the department took over responsibility for construction of all new City buildings. The department also worked with the Architectural Panel (established in 1950) to approve the construction of certain buildings.

By 1959 the internal structure had been simplified to only four sections: Accounting; Building Maintenance (which included a mail and security section); the Assistant City Architect; and an Inspection Division for building plans, construction, plumbing and heating.

By 1965, the department was headed by the City Architect and divided into three divisions: Architectural Design, Building Inspection, and Building Maintenance. The Architectural Design Division provided architectural services and advice to civic departments on construction projects. The Building Inspection Division inspected and controlled the construction of buildings and structures erected within city limits. The Building Maintenance Division provided and maintained working facilities for City staff in various City-owned buildings. This division also supervised janitorial staff, maintenance and carried out building alterations.

The Architect’s and Building Inspector’s Department was dissolved in 1970. The successors to the Architect’s and Building Inspector’s Department were the Planning Department (Building Inspection Branch) and the Property and Building Management Department (Architecture Branch, Maintenance, and Edmonton Community Housing Organization).

Results 61 to 70 of 448