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Wilkins, Gordon A.

  • AR-MS-1184
  • Pessoa singular
  • 1891-1947

Gordon Wilkins was born 26 Jun 1886 to Harriet and Richard Wilkins in York (Toronto), Ontario. By 1909 Gordon was in Edmonton working as jeweler and watchmaker at Kline’s Jewelry and he was boarding at 547 Clara Street.

Gordon married Edna L. Tomlinson in Edmonton in 1912. They had two children, Wayne and Lenora, and the family moved to a home near 105 Avenue and 102 Street. By 1921, Gordon and Edna divorced. Gordon moved to Toronto, Ontario with the children, and Edna remained in Edmonton.

Gordon married Kathleen Jacob on 1 Jan 1924 in Toronto, Ontario. Gordon and Kathleen had one son, Ross.

Gordon Wilkins died on 11 Nov 1947.

Rock, Donald

  • AR-MS-1185
  • Pessoa singular
  • 1913-2006

Donald Rock was born 28 Sep 1913 to Elizabeth Green and Albert J. Rock in Winnipeg, Manitoba. The family moved to Michigan in 1915.
Donald married Ada D. Bartoletti in 1938 in Michigan. They had five children including son Duane. Donald worked as a railway switchman and then a surveyor. The family came to Canada for a vacation in the 1960s, travelling to various cities across the country, including Edmonton.
Donald J. Rock died 1 Nov 2006 in Iron Mountain, Michigan.

Egge Family

  • AR-MS-119
  • Família
  • 1853-1973

Egge, Budd Newton 1881-1954
Egge, Clara 1883-1973
Egge, Cynthia Nash 1860-1922
Egge, Jessie Cyrus 1889-1931
Egge, Newton 1853-1929

Newton Egge was born in the United States around 1854. He married Cynthia Nash in 1880. They had three children – Budd Newton, Clara Belle and Jesse Cyrus.
The family arrived in the Edmonton area around 1894 to try his hand in coal mining. In 1898, Newton took a homestead and moved the family from Fort Edmonton to Halfway Lake (near Clyde) on the Athabasca Trail.
Between 1898 and 1906, Newton Egge built a stopping house in the area. Stopping houses were farm-houses that took in guests and provided meals. When the railway to Athbasca Landing was completed in 1912, trail traffic greatly reduced and the Egges reverted primarily to farming. Cynthia Nash Egge died in 1922 and Newton Egge died 31 Dec 1929 in Lethbridge. They are buried in the Dungannon Cemetery in Clyde, Alberta. Egge descendants continued to live in the Edmonton area.
The well-known Egge stopping house was moved to Fort Edmonton Park where it was restored.

Byron, May Family

  • AR-MS-1192
  • Família
  • 1878-2001

Byron, Elizabeth (Betty) 1909-1986
Byron, Grace 1913-1995
Byron, Jane 1916-1920
Byron, Joseph 1915-2007
Byron, Louise Marrin 1884-1956
Byron, Percy 1878-1959
May, Florence Byron 1880-1956
May, Gilbert 1906-2001
May, George 1915-1990
May, Gustave 1881-1943
May, Gustave Jr. 1910-1964
May, Joseph 1908-1983

Percy Byron arrived in Edmonton from New York in April 1906 with the intention of ranching or farming. However he quickly realized there were no ‘photographic engraving’ businesses in the area at the time and he saw an opportunity. Within twenty-four hours of arriving in Edmonton, he arranged to have a ‘complete photographic engraving plant’ sent to Edmonton, and by August he was producing photographic images.

The following year, Percy’s brother-in-law, Gustave May, joined him in Edmonton and the Byron-May Company was formed. The photography and photographic engraving business was quite successful for the next decade, enjoying many commissions and professional accolades (see Edmonton Bulletin 1911 Anniversary Edition, p. 75).

Florence Byron, Percy’s sister who had married Gustave May in 1905, joined him in Edmonton with their infant son, Joseph. Percy Byron married Louise Marrin in 1908 while on a visit to New York and his wife also came to Edmonton. Both families enjoyed prosperity and success in Edmonton. Florence and Gustave May had three more children. Percy and Louise Byron had four children in Edmonton.

However, the Byron-May Company fell on hard times with the coming of World War I and the business was sold to McDermid Engraving in 1917. Both the Byron and May families returned to New York the following year.

Byron-May Company

  • AR-MS-1192-S-1
  • Pessoa coletiva
  • 1906-1917

Percy Byron arrived in Edmonton in April 1906 with the intention of ranching or farming. However he quickly realized there were no ‘photographic engraving’ businesses, ie businesses capable of producing publications with photographs, in the area at the time. In fact there were none between Winnipeg and Vancouver. As the son of famous New York photographer Joseph Byron, he saw an opportunity. Within twenty-four hours of arriving in Edmonton, he telegraphed his father to ship one ‘complete photographic engraving plant’. He set up a shop on First Street (now 101 Street) and by August he was producing photographic images.

The following year, Percy’s brother-in-law, Gustave May, joined him and the Byron-May Company was formed. While Byron-May are often credited with predominance in scenic imagery photography, a staple in their business was the capacity to produce illustrated catalogues and brochures with their photoengraving equipment. This was a crucial advantage in the early days of advertising.

By 1913, the Byron-May Co. had over 10 employees. As their business grew they found an investor and built a two-storey brick building at 252 Howard Avenue (now 100A Street). The Edmonton Chamber of Commerce commissioned the Byron-May Company to create images and produce brochures promoting Edmonton. Some of these images have become iconic in telling the history of Edmonton.

The Byron-May Company fell on hard times with the coming of World War I and the business was sold to McDermid Engraving in 1917. Both Percy Byron and Gustave May returned to New York with their families.

Byron, Percy

  • AR-MS-1192-S-2
  • Família
  • 1878-1959

Percy Byron was born 21 Sep 1878 to Julia Lewin and Joseph Byron in Nottingham, England. In 1899, he emigrated to the United States with his parents and siblings – Maude, Georgiana, Florence, and Philip. His father, Joseph Byron, became a celebrated New York photographer.

Percy emigrated to Edmonton in April 1906 with the intention of homesteading or ranching. Realizing there were no photography businesses in Edmonton, he quickly sent for a ‘photographic engraving plant’ and by August of that year had set up business. A year later he was joined by his brother-in-law, Gustave May, and the Byron-May company was formed.

In 1908 Percy married Louise (Lulu) Marrin in Richmond, New York. Louise returned to Edmonton with Percy. They had four children, all born in Edmonton – Elizabeth (Betty), Grace, Joseph, and Jane.

The Byron-May Company fell on hard times with the coming of World War I and the business was sold to McDermid Engraving in 1917. The following year, Percy moved his family back to New York. He continued in the photography business, specializing in steamship photography.

Louise Marrin Byron died 31 Jul 1956 in New York, USA.
Percy Byron died in 9 Jun 1959 in New York, USA.

May, Gustave

  • AR-MS-1192-S-3
  • Família
  • 1881-1943

Gustave Henry May was born 2 Jun 1881 to Estelle Lebrethon and Gustave C. May in New York, USA.

In 1905 Gustave married Florence Byron, sister of Percy Byron, in Manhattan, New York. A son, Gilbert, was born in 1906 in New York.

The following year Gustave, Florence, and Gilbert moved to Edmonton where Gustave joined his brother-in-law, Percy Byron, to form the photography business Byron-May Co.

Gustave and Florence had three more sons, all born in Edmonton – Joseph, Gustave Jr., and George.

In 1912 Gustave May was elected to the Edmonton City Council. He was popularly known as the ‘Water Alderman’ for his strong advocacy for fixing the city’s lack of water for bathing and firefighting.

The Byron-May Company fell on hard times with the coming of World War I and the business was sold to McDermid Engraving in 1917. The following year, Gustave moved his family back to New York. Gustave went on to work in the newspaper industry.

Gustave H. May died 31 May 1943 in New Jersey, USA.
Florence Byron May died in 1956 in New Jersey, USA.

Schneider, Jean

  • AR-MS-1195
  • Pessoa singular
  • 1934-1999

Jean M. Kaiser was born in Lloydminister, Saskatchewan to Irene Roy and Joseph Kaiser in 1934. The family moved to Alberta and a sister, Louise, was born in 1939, and a brother, Norman, was born in 1940. In 1953, Jean was teaching at St. Thomas School in Edmonton.

It is likely through teaching that she met Francis (Frank) A. Schneider. Frank began teaching with the Edmonton Catholic Schools and eventually became a Principal, and later Area Superintendent.

Jean Kaiser married Frank Schneider in 1955. The couple had one daughter, Patti-Jean, and five sons, Robert, John, Paul, Mark, and David.

Frank Schneider died in 1979. Jean Kaiser Schneider died in 1999.

Edmonton Hospital Board

  • AR-MS-12
  • Pessoa coletiva
  • 1913 - [19--?]

The Edmonton Hospital Board was formed in 1913 to amalgamate the operations of three city hospitals- the Royal Alexandra Hospital, Strathcona General Hospital and the Isolation Hospital. Edmonton's first hospital was established in 1886 by Canon Newton and his sister, a nurse, at the Hermitage. In 1895 the Edmonton General Hospital was opened by the Soeurs de la Charité de Montréal (Grey Nuns). Edmonton Public Hospital was organized in 1899, partly due to a dispute between the administrators of the General Hospital and some Edmonton physicians. It was incorporated by a North-west Territories ordinance (ch. 43) and opened in 1900. Its charter was confirmed by an Alberta act in 1906, which changed the name to the City Hospital. It was replaced by the Royal Alexandra Hospital, which was built beginning in 1910. After its amalgamation under the Edmonton Hospital Board, possibly the result of financial irregularities discovered earlier in 1913, the provincially chartered organization became the Royal Alexandra Hospital Association, which supported the Edmonton Hospital Board until ca. 1926. The Strathcona General Hospital Board was established under a by-law (no. 433) of the then City of Strathcona in 1911, continued by an Edmonton by-law (no. 400) after the amalgamation of the cities of Edmonton and Strathcona. After the 1913 amalgamation, it continued until ca. 1915 as a hospital committee. There is no information in the fonds about the management of the Isolation Hospital prior to the creation of a hospital committee under the Edmonton Hospital Board.

McDonald, Kenneth

  • AR-MS-120
  • Pessoa singular
  • 1828-1906

Kenneth McDonald was born in Stornoway, Isle of Lewis, Scotland in 1828 and came to Rupert’s Land as a Hudson’s Bay Company employee ca. 1847. He married Emma Rowland (daughter of William Rowland, an employee of the Hudson’s Bay Company, and Betsey Ballendine) on Feb. 10, 1854. They settled in the Fort Edmonton district in 1860 and he claimed River Lot 20 after the transfer of Rupert’s Land to Canada in 1870. They had seven children, William, Alex, Caroline, Betsy, Flora, Eliza and Catherine.
Kenneth McDonald died on 6 Aug 1906.
Kenneth McDonald’s farm home was moved to Fort Edmonton Park in 1967 and preserved.

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